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Nepal's Maoist chief loses seat in elections: State TV

Nepal's former Maoist rebel leader lost his seat Thursday in this week's national elections, state television reported, as he alleged poll-rigging and called for a halt to the vote count. Pushpa Kamal Dahal, known better as Prachanda, came third in his Kathmandu constituency, trailing the winning candidate from the Nepali Congress party by more than 7,500 votes, state-run Nepal Television said.

Key dates in Nepal's history since 1960

Nepal held national elections Tuesday which will be crucial in completing a peace process stalled for years since the end of a decade-long civil war. Here is a timeline of key events in the Himalayan nation's history since 1960: 1960: King Mahendra seizes control after a brief period of multi-party democracy. He bans political parties and suspends the constitution. Two years later, he establishes the "panchayat" system, which grants the king absolute power. 1972: King Mahendra dies, Birendra succeeds him.

Nepal's revolutionary leader loses his appeal as nation limps to the polls

By Sanjeev Miglani and Gopal Sharma CHAPAGAUN, Nepal (Reuters) - - Widow Narayan Kumari Ghimire has lost faith in Nepal's powerful Maoists: the only reason they will get her vote in Tuesday's election is because her son died fighting for them during the insurrection that ended seven years ago. For Ghimire, 62, the one-time guerrillas have turned out to be no better than the rest of Nepal's grasping and ever-bickering politicians since they took off their red bandanas, gave up arms and tasted power in a 2008 election.

Nepal's revolutionary leader loses his appeal as nation limps to the polls

By Sanjeev Miglani and Gopal Sharma CHAPAGAUN, Nepal (Reuters) - - Widow Narayan Kumari Ghimire has lost faith in Nepal's powerful Maoists: the only reason they will get her vote in Tuesday's election is because her son died fighting for them during the insurrection that ended seven years ago. For Ghimire, 62, the one-time guerrillas have turned out to be no better than the rest of Nepal's grasping and ever-bickering politicians since they took off their red bandanas, gave up arms and tasted power in a 2008 election.

Nepal disillusioned by top Maoists' taste for luxury

When Nepal ousted the monarchy and voted in a Maoist-led government in 2008, few anticipated that, five years on, the former guerrillas would come under fire for living like kings. Commentators and former rebels say the party's leadership has swapped its revolutionary ideals for corruption-fuelled luxury, with the strongest criticism reserved for chairman Pushpa Kamal Dahal, better known by the nom-de-guerre Prachanda. The Maoists came to power promising social change, economic growth and lasting peace for a country devastated by a decade-long civil war.

Chef who slapped Nepal Maoist chief to fight election

A disgruntled former Maoist who rose to fame in Nepal after slapping the country's leading leftwing politician announced plans Thursday to fight him in upcoming elections. Padam Kunwar, a 26-year-old chef who assaulted Maoist chairman Pushpa Kamal Dahal last November, registered himself as an independent candidate in the leader's constituency in the capital Kathmandu. "I have fielded my candidacy not to defeat anyone but to win the election," Kunwar, who was a member of the Maoist party until June last year, told reporters on Thursday.

Nepal Maoists end first post-war convention

The head of Nepal's ruling Maoists on Friday pledged that the country was headed towards elections after he cemented his position as leader at the end of the party's biggest post-revolutionary meeting. Pushpa Kamal Dahal, better known as Prachanda, was returned as party chairman at the Maoists general convention which was designed to reaffirm their commitment towards democracy after successfully toppling the monarchy in 2008.

Nepal's Maoists to hand premiership to independent

Nepal's Maoists vowed Saturday never to return to guerrilla warfare and offered to give up leadership to an independent prime minister to take the Himalayan nation towards democracy. Party leaders said at their general convention they would step down from government to seek a popular mandate to lead a "socialist revolution", six years after a decade-long insurgency which toppled the world's last Hindu monarchy.

URGENT ¥¥¥ Nepal's Maoists to hand premiership to independent

Nepal's Maoists vowed Saturday never to return to guerrilla warfare and offered to give up leadership of the nation to an independent prime minister to lead the Himalayan nation towards democracy. Party leaders said at their general convention they would step down from government to seek the mandate of the people to lead a "socialist revolution", six years after their armed insurgency toppled the world's last Hindu monarchy.
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