Connect to share and comment

Household woes overshadow EU talks in Iceland election

Iceland's centre-right opposition vowed to create jobs and ease the population's debt burden, as the crisis-battered nation voted in a general election marked by discontent with the leftist government's austerity measures. The right-wing Independence Party and the centrist-agrarian Progressive Party, who both want to end the northern Atlantic nation's EU accession talks, are expected to form a new coalition. The two parties have staged a remarkable comeback since being punished in the 2009 election for financial woes hitting the small island nation of 320,000 people.

Polls open in Iceland general election

Polling stations opened on Saturday in Iceland, where the leftist coalition elected in 2009 in the wake of the country's financial crisis is expected to be voted out of power. The right-wing Independence Party and the centrist-agrarian Progressive Party, who both want to end the North Atlantic nation's EU accession talks, are expected to form a new coalition. The biggest party traditionally picks the prime minister but polls in the final weeks of campaigning have put the two parties neck-and-neck.

Opposition tipped to win Iceland general election

Iceland goes to the polls on Saturday in a general election expected to return an opposition centre-right coalition to power four years after it was ousted over its handling of the country's dire financial crisis. An opposition victory will likely spell the end of Reykjavik's European Union membership negotiations, as both the centrist Progressive Party and the eurosceptic conservative Independence Party are in favour of putting a halt to Iceland's bid.

Iceland: the two main candidates for prime minister

Two young Icelandic MPs, Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson and Bjarni Benediktsson, are the main contenders for the post of prime minister when Icelanders cast their ballots on Saturday. With their opposition parties running neck and neck, voters won't know which candidate will be tasked with forming a coalition government until the polls have closed.

Iceland centre-right opposition poised for election win

Iceland's centre-right opposition is seen likely to win general elections Saturday after a leftist coalition failed to meet voters' expectations in the aftermath of a financial crisis that threatened to capsize the country. Polls show a dead heat between the conservative Independence Party, in power for much of the postwar period, and the centrist-agrarian Progress Party, and both are vying to get their candidate in the prime minister's seat.

Iceland's ruling party picks EU supporter for top job

Iceland's Social Democratic Alliance party Saturday elected as chairman a lawyer known for his support of the euro, replacing Prime Minister Johanna Sigurdardottir who is due to retire at the end of her term. "In the (April) elections ahead the strength of the Social Democratic Alliance will be tested as never before," Arni Pall Arnason said in his acceptance speech. As Iceland's economic affairs minister between 2010 and 2011, Arnason advocated adopting the euro and positioned himself as a strong supporter of Reykjavik's plans to join the European Union.
Syndicate content