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Iceland voters return centre-right to power

Iceland's voters returned to office a centre-right coalition once blamed for the worst financial meltdown in the nation's history, but a new online activist movement could bring change, final poll figures showed Sunday. The North Atlantic nation, fatigued after four years of austerity measures under a leftist government, threw its lot behind the right-wing Independence Party and the centrist-agrarian Progressive Party.

Iceland centre-right opposition claims election win

Iceland's centre-right opposition declared victory Sunday in parliamentary elections, as voters punished the incumbent leftist government for harsh austerity measures during its four years at the helm. If confirmed, it would mark a return to power for the right-wing Independence Party and the centrist-agrarian Progressive Party, which both want to end the Atlantic island nation's European Union accession talks.

Iceland centre-right wins election, final count shows

Iceland's centre-right opposition scored a clear victory in the island's parliamentary poll, allowing the two parties to kick off negotiations for a coalition government, a final count Sunday showed. The right-wing Independence Party was ahead in the popular vote with 26.7 percent, giving it 19 seats in parliament, and its leader Bjarni Benediktsson was expected to seek a government with the support of the agrarian-centrist Progressive Party, which got 24.4 percent of the vote and also 19 legislative seats. hh/ph/lc

Iceland centre-right opposition claims election win

Iceland's centre-right opposition declared victory early Sunday in parliamentary elections, as voters punished the incumbent leftist government for harsh austerity measures during its four years at the helm. It marked a return to power for the rightwing Independence Party and the centrist-agrarian Progressive Party, which both want to end the Atlantic island nation's European Union accession talks.

Iceland conservative leader claims PM post

The leader of Iceland's conservative Independence Party, Bjarni Benediktsson, early Sunday claimed the post of prime minister after the centre-right opposition ousted the country's leftist government. "The Independence Party is called to duty again," Benediktsson told supporters, saying he was ready to negotiate a coalition that would lead the country.

Opposition leading Iceland vote in early count

Iceland's centre-right opposition took the lead after polls closed Saturday in parliamentary elections, as voters punished the leftist coalition for austerity measures during its four years in power, according to early estimates. A partial count of ballots in four of the country's six voting districts showed the centrist-agrarian Progressive Party with 16 parliamentary seats, the conservative Independence Party with 19 seats and the Social Democratic Alliance Party trailing its rivals with just 10 seats.

Opposition leading Iceland vote in early count

Iceland's centre-right opposition took an early lead after polls closed Saturday in parliamentary elections, as voters punished the leftist coalition for austerity measures during its four years in power, according to early estimates. A partial count of ballots in one of the country's six voting districts -- a rural area in the south -- showed the centrist-agrarian Progressive Party with 33.5 percent of the vote, the conservative Independence Party with 28.4 percent and the Social Democratic Alliance Party trailing its rivals with just 10.5 percent.

Household woes overshadow EU talks in Iceland election

Iceland's centre-right opposition was seen winning Saturday's election after offering homeowners debt relief on ballooning mortgages, but there was little enthusiasm outside polling stations in what was largely seen as a protest vote. The right-wing Independence Party and the centrist-agrarian Progressive Party, who both want to end the northern Atlantic nation's EU accession talks, are expected to form a new coalition.

Household woes overshadow EU talks in Iceland election

Iceland's centre-right opposition vowed to create jobs and ease the population's debt burden, as the crisis-battered nation voted in a general election marked by discontent with the leftist government's austerity measures. The right-wing Independence Party and the centrist-agrarian Progressive Party, who both want to end the northern Atlantic nation's EU accession talks, are expected to form a new coalition. The two parties have staged a remarkable comeback since being punished in the 2009 election for financial woes hitting the small island nation of 320,000 people.

After crash, modesty a virtue in Iceland politics

No rallies, baby-kissing or even posters: If you weren't told there was an election underway in Iceland this week, you wouldn't know it from walking down the streets of central Reykjavik. The campaigning ahead of Saturday's parliamentary poll has been a far cry from the last pre-crash vote of 2007, when the island nation's bloated banks poured money into the parties' coffers. "Some candidates came to the university. Otherwise I haven't seen any of them. Maybe they're shy," suggested Skuli Stinn Vilbergsson, a 29-year-old student.
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