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Peru volcano spews white hot rocks, prompts evacuation

Residents have fled villages near Peru's Ubinas volcano, which this week began spitting out white hot chunks of rock, some as big as 30 centimeters (one foot) in diameter. Domingo Ramos, a scientist from Peru's mining institute, said the volcano reawakened several days ago. The renewed activity led the government to announce a state of emergency in the Andean region of Moquegua, some 1,200 kilometers (750 miles) south of Lima. The region is home to some 40 volcanoes, most of which, unlike Ubinas, are dormant.

Peru volcano spews white hot rocks, prompts evacuation

Residents have fled villages near Peru's Ubinas volcano, which this week began spitting out white hot chunks of rock, some as big as 30 centimeters (one foot) in diameter. Domingo Ramos, a scientist from Peru's mining institute, said the volcano reawakened several days ago. The renewed activity led the government to announce a state of emergency in the Andean region of Moquegua, some 1,200 kilometers (750 miles) south of Lima. The region is home to some 40 volcanoes, most of which, unlike Ubinas, are dormant.

Ohio geologists link small earthquakes to hydraulic fracturing, change permit conditions

COLUMBUS, Ohio - State geologists in Ohio have for the first time linked earthquakes in a geologic formation deep under the Appalachians to gas drilling, leading the state to issue new permit conditions in certain areas that are among the nation's strictest. A state investigation of five small tremors in the Youngstown area, in the Appalachian foothills, last month has found the high-pressure injection of sand and water that accompanies hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in the Utica Shale may have increased pressure on a small, unknown fault, said State Oil

Villagers eye Ecuador volcano after spectacular eruption

Villagers and experts warily eyed an Ecuador volcano Saturday that spewed a 10-kilometer (six-mile) high column of ash a day earlier in a spectacular eruption. "For now, the ash fall is mild," Ecuador's National Secretariat for Risk Management said on its Twitter account. It called activity at the volcano, which is 130 kilometers south of the capital Quito, "moderate to high." But it admitted that "it is difficult to predict future behavior."

Ecuador's Tungurahua volcano blast pours out ash, incandescent rock

Quito, Apr 5 (EFE).- A powerful explosion in Ecuador's Tungurahua volcano kicked off an eruption lasting five minutes with emissions of pulverized incandescent rock and a column of ash that rose 10 kilometers (6 miles) above the crater, the Geophysical Institute reported. The blast came at 6:10 p.m. Friday, and the pyroclastic flows of hot pulverized rock poured down the volcano's northwestern and northern ravines, the institute said.

Series of small earthquakes rock Oklahoma in record seismic activity

By Carey Gillam (Reuters) - Earthquakes rattled residents in Oklahoma on Saturday, the latest in a series that have put the state on track for record quake activity this year, which some seismologists say may be tied to oil and gas exploration. One earthquake recorded at 3.8 magnitude by the U.S. Geological Survey rocked houses in several communities around central Oklahoma at 7:42 a.m. local time. Another about two hours earlier in the same part of the state, north of Oklahoma City, was recorded at 2.9 magnitude, USGS said.

Ecuador's 'throat of fire' belches giant ash column

A volcano in central Ecuador spewed up a column of hot ash and smoke 10 kilometers (six miles) high on Friday, increasing fears of an eruption. Activity has been building at the Tungurahua volcano 130 kilometers south of the capital Quito since early February, and on Friday experts reported a loud explosion "that lasted for five minutes" and an expulsion of ash. "For now ashfall is mild," said the National Secretariat for Risk Management on its Twitter account. Tungurahua, which in the Quechua language means "throat of fire," has been erupting since 1999.

Chileans spend second night outdoors after new quake

Thousands of shaken Chileans spent a second night in the streets and makeshift shelters early Thursday following a 7.6-magnitude earthquake that struck 24 hours after an even stronger tremor killed six. President Michelle Bachelet, who was assessing damage from Tuesday's massive 8.2 jolt, was among those forced to flee late Wednesday as the latest temblor sowed terror among already exhausted and nervous residents.

Weary Chileans head for hills as earthquake aftershocks continue

By Ivan Alvarado IQUIQUE, Chile (Reuters) - As the aftershocks from a massive 8.2 magnitude quake that rattled northern Chile entered a third day on Thursday, basic services were still out in the port city nearest the epicenter and residents fearful of tsunamis were fleeing into the hills. The quake on Tuesday was blamed for six deaths and residents have been hit by dozens of aftershocks, including a powerful 7.6 magnitude quake on Wednesday night. Both quakes triggered tsunami warnings and evacuations.

New strong quake hits Chile

A powerful offshore earthquake measuring 7.6 rocked northern Chile late Wednesday, sparking a new tsunami warning and sending thousands of people fleeing for higher ground a day after a deadly tremor killed six people. Chilean President Michelle Bachelet, who was assessing damage from Tuesday's 8.2 jolt, was among those forced to evacuate as the latest quake sowed terror among exhausted and nervous residents. "People are running around terrified," a resident of the northern city of Iquique told Canal 13 in a telephone interview. "It is still moving, it is terrible."
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