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Thieves steal part of Pompeii fresco

Thieves have stolen part of an ancient fresco from Pompeii, breaking in to a closed area of the UNESCO World Heritage landmark and chipping off a portrait of a Greek deity. A custodian doing rounds last week discovered "the removal of a part of a fresco in the House of Neptune," where a depiction of the goddess Artemis had been "chiseled off with a metallic object," the Roman site's curator department said in a statement Tuesday.

Strong 6.2 magnitude aftershock hits off northern Chile

WASHINGTON, March 17 (Reuter) - A strong aftershock 6.2 in magnitude struck offshore northern Chile early on Monday, the U.S. Geological Survey said, following a 6.7 magnitude earthquake nearby on Sunday that caused only minor damage but led to brief evacuations along the coast. The aftershock struck 47 miles west-northwest of Iquique at 2:11 a.m. local time (0511 GMT) at a relatively shallow depth of 6.6 miles, USGS said. There were no immediate reports of damage or injuries.

Magnitude 6.7 earthquake rocks Chile

A powerful 6.7-magnitude earthquake jolted Chile's northern coast Sunday, US geologists said, generating a small tsunami and prompting authorities to evacuate three cities. The quake struck at 6:16 pm (2116 GMT), according to the US Geological Survey, which had originally put the magnitude at 7.0. Located 60 kilometers (38 miles) west-northwest of the port city of Iquique, the quake was 20 kilometers deep, the USGS said in an update. It was followed by a series of aftershocks.

Magnitude 7.0 earthquake rocks Chile

A powerful magnitude 7.0 earthquake jolted Chile's northwestern coast Sunday, US geologists said, though there were no immediate reports of major damage or injuries. The quake struck at 5:16 pm (2116 GMT), according to the US Geological Survey, which had originally said that two quakes rattled the area within a minute of each other. Located 61 kilometers (38 miles) northwest of the port city of Iquique, the temblor was 35 kilometers deep.

Magnitude 7.0 earthquake rocks Chile

A powerful magnitude 7.0 earthquake jolted Chile's northwestern coast Sunday, US geologists said, though there were no immediate reports of major damage or injuries. The quake struck at 5:16 pm (2116 GMT), according to the US Geological Survey, which had originally said that two quakes rattled the area within a minute of each other. Located 61 kilometers (38 miles) northwest of the port city of Iquique, the temblor was 35 kilometers deep. A 5.1 aftershock struck 10 minutes later, at 5:26 pm (2126 GMT). It was located 36 kilometers north-northwest of Iquique.

Melting away: vanishing ice warning for 'Africa's Alps'

In swirling snow, John Medenge prods a thin ice bridge over a crevasse with an iron-tipped spear, guiding climbers scaling the steep glacial wall using crampons and axes. "We are the last few who will climb on the ice, it is going so fast," said Medenge, after scaling the treacherous ridge up Mount Stanley, part of the dramatic Rwenzori mountain range straddling the border between Uganda and Democratic Republic of Congo.

Strong 6.3-magnitude quake hits off Japan, injures 17

A strong 6.3-magnitude earthquake struck off southern Japan early Friday injuring 17 people, reports said as officials warned residents to be alert to the danger of landslides following the tremor. There was no tsunami warning or reports of major damage. Public broadcaster NHK said 17 people were injured. None of the injuries seemed to be life-threatening.

Jules Verne on to something: Study hints at water deposits deep in the Earth

EDMONTON - Jules Verne was on to something. In his classic 1864 adventure story "Journey to the Centre of Earth," the French novelist imagined a vast ocean deep within the planet's bowels. University of Alberta scientists have found the first direct evidence that he wasn't far off. "The original idea is a Jules Verne idea, isn't it?" laughs geologist Graham Pearson. "One hundred years later it turns out to be pretty much true — except you can't really stand around and see the water."

Volcanoes saw species survive ice ages

The steam and heat from volcanoes allowed species of plants and animals to survive past ice ages, a study showed Tuesday, offering help for scientists dealing with climate change. An international team of researchers said their analysis helped explain a long-running mystery about how some species thrived, often in isolation, in areas covered by glaciers, with volcanoes acting as an oasis of life during long cold periods.

Volcanoes helped species survive ice ages

The steam and heat from volcanoes allowed species of plants and animals to survive past ice ages, a study showed Tuesday, offering help for scientists dealing with climate change. An international team of researchers said their analysis helped explain a long-running mystery about how some species thrived in areas covered by glaciers, with volcanoes acting as an oasis of life during long cold periods.
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