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Australia fumes at UK ban on historic kangaroo, dingo art

The National Gallery of Australia on Thursday blasted Britain's decision to block the export of two historic paintings of a kangaroo and a dingo as depriving the nation of its heritage. The two oils by British artist George Stubbs are thought to be the first depiction of the animals in Western art, with the kangaroo in the painting the basis for Australia's earliest coat of arms.

Australia fumes at UK ban on historic kangaroo, dingo art

The National Gallery of Australia on Thursday blasted Britain's decision to block the export of two historic paintings of a kangaroo and a dingo as depriving the nation of its heritage. The two oils by British artist George Stubbs are thought to be the first depiction of the animals in Western art, with the kangaroo in the painting the basis for Australia's earliest coat of arms.

UK foils Australian bid to buy kangaroo, dingo paintings

Two paintings thought to be the first depiction of a kangaroo and a dingo in Western art will remain in Britain after a national fundraising campaign to stop them being sold to an Australian gallery, officials said Wednesday. The oils by British animal painter George Stubbs were first exhibited in London in 1773, giving the public their first glimpse of the exotic creatures most identified with the wild new territory of Australia.

Kangaroo checks in to Australian Airport

Australian police had to lock down part of Melbourne Airport Wednesday after a kangaroo bounced into the terminal and surprised passengers shopping in a pharmacy. Wildlife rescue volunteers were called in to tranquilise and capture the distressed eastern grey male, which had been hit by a car on his way to the building that services both international and domestic flights. "Cyrus, as he has been aptly named after one of the helpers on the scene, will be assessed by a vet following his ordeal," Wildlife Victoria said.

RugbyU: Minister not behind 'rooting for Wallabies' ad

An Australian minister has called for the removal of a huge, risque "Rooting for the Wallabies" advertisement which shows a wallaby in a compromising position with a lion. The tongue-in-cheek ad, daubed across a field on the approach to Melbourne international airport ahead of Australia's rugby series with the British and Irish Lions, shows a wallaby in an Australia jersey winking as he hugs a red-shirted lion from behind.

Australian MP bopped on the hop by kangaroo

An Australian politician was left hopping after he was attacked by a kangaroo while on a morning jog in the national capital Canberra. "Mugged by a kangaroo!," declared Shane Rattenbury, Australian Capital Territory municipal services minister, on Twitter. Rattenbury was left with deep scratches and bruising on his leg after the encounter with the bounding marsupial on Thursday morning. "I'm not sure who got the bigger shock, me or the kangaroo," he told the ABC. "He was minding his own business eating some grass, I was minding my own business running.

Green shoots in Australia's bush tucker boom

Wild plants and meals of swamp wallaby, lizard, or wombat sustained Australia's indigenous people for tens of thousands of years before British settlers brought a radical change of diet. But so-called "bush tucker" -- the local fruits, shoots and creatures that also include kangaroo and crocodile -- are enjoying something of a renaissance on dining tables Down Under.
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