Connect to share and comment

TEPCO labor union wants utility to drop 20% salary cut

The labor union of Tokyo Electric Power Co. plans to ask the utility as soon as this week to retract its 20 percent cut in employees' annual salaries, a company source said Sunday. The union wants to prevent the departure of employees with expertise in areas that could help rebuild TEPCO, the source said. The request will be a follow-up to the utility's new business turnaround plan approved by the government in January, in which TEPCO said it will reduce the size of the salary cut.

Chubu Electric seeks to restart Hamaoka nuclear plant

Chubu Electric Power Co. applied Friday for a state safety assessment of one of its reactors at the Hamaoka nuclear power plant in central Japan that was forced to shut down in 2011 as the previous government viewed operation of the complex as too risky. With the move, the total number of reactors for which applications for safety checks have been submitted to the Nuclear Regulation Authority rose to 17.

Fukushima should eye 'controlled discharges' in sea

The UN nuclear watchdog on Thursday urged Japan to consider "controlled discharges" into the sea of contaminated water used to cool the crippled reactors at Fukushima. The proposal was among recommendations outlined in a report by the International Atomic Energy Agency after its latest inspection of the worst nuclear accident in a generation. "The IAEA team believes it is necessary to find a sustainable solution to the problem of managing contaminated water," the 72-page report said.

Tepco took months to release record strontium readings at Fukushima

By Mari Saito TOKYO (Reuters) - The operator of Japan's wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant knew about record high measurements of a dangerous isotope in groundwater at the plant for five months before telling the country's nuclear watchdog, a regulatory official told Reuters.

Fukushima signs renewable energy pact with German state

Fukushima Prefecture has signed an agreement with the German state of North Rhine-Westphalia to work together to promote the use of renewable energy. The prefecture, which hosts Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant crippled by the 2011 quake and tsunami, aims to introduce renewable energy technologies from Germany, a leader in the field, to realize a society not dependent on nuclear power.

People hosting nuclear plants voice hope, caution over new Tokyo gov.

Residents of Japanese towns and cities that host nuclear power plants expressed both hope and wariness over the victory of former health minister Yoichi Masuzoe in the Tokyo gubernatorial race on Sunday. Some said they expect Masuzoe, 65, to exercise leadership as the new governor of Japan's capital on energy policy, while urging him not to ignore the number of antinuclear votes cast in the closely watched election.

Election's nuclear focus draws mixed emotions from Fukushima evacuees

Evacuees from Fukushima Prefecture, relocated to the nation's capital region following the 2011 nuclear crisis, will be among those closely following Sunday's Tokyo gubernatorial election, with some voicing mixed feelings about the focus on nuclear power as an election issue. "For evacuees, doing away with nuclear power is something that is taken for granted," said Megumi Okada, a 31-year-old homemaker who moved out of Fukushima City.

Gov't hints allowing construction of 3 nuclear reactors to proceed

Economy, Trade and Industry Minister Toshimitsu Motegi suggested Thursday the government will allow the completion of three planned nuclear reactors in western and northeastern Japan. Motegi said while the government does not expect any "new" reactors to be built for the time being, the three already-approved reactors, including Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s No. 1 unit at the Higashidori plant in Aomori Prefecture, are not considered "new."

Gov't hints allowing construction of 3 nuclear reactors to proceed

Economy, Trade and Industry Minister Toshimitsu Motegi suggested Thursday the government will allow the completion of three planned nuclear reactors in western and northeastern Japan. Motegi said while the government does not expect any "new" reactors to be built for the time being, the three already-approved reactors, including Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s No. 1 unit at the Higashidori plant in Aomori Prefecture, are not considered "new."

Gov't seeks approval for dumping Fukushima plant groundwater into sea

The government on Monday sought approval of a nationwide fisheries federation to dump groundwater at the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear complex into the sea on condition that the water's contamination level is far below the legal limit. During talks with the head of the National Federation of Fisheries Co-operative Associations, industry ministry officials explained that they plan to set "strict" operational procedures for the pump system to allay the concerns of fishermen who think the move could deal a blow to their business.
Syndicate content