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Pakistan's Malala hails Mandela, 'my leader'

Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai, who survived being shot in the head by the Taliban to champion girls' rights to education, paid tribute to "my leader" Nelson Mandela on Friday following his death. The 16-year-old, who earlier this year was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize that Mandela won in 1993, said Mandela would "never die" and was a "perpetual inspiration" for people around the world. "Nelson Mandela is physically separated from us but his soul and spirit will never die," Malala, who is now at school in Britain, said in a statement.

Pakistan's Malala Yousafzai receives EU Sakharov rights prize

Pakistani teenager Malala Yousafzai was handed the EU's prestigious Sakharov human rights prize Wednesday in recognition of her crusade for the right of all children, girls and boys, to an education. To thunderous applause announcing the European Parliament prize, the assembly's president Martin Schulz praised the 16-year-old activist as "a survivor, a heroine and an extraordinary young woman" and said: "You have given hope to millions of people."

Malala reunited with Pakistan attack schoolfriends

Campaigning Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai was reunited on Saturday with two friends who were injured in the Taliban attempt to kill her. Kainat Riaz and Shazia Ramzan met Malala during an event at Edinburgh University in Scotland, the first time they have seen her since the attack. A Taliban gunman boarded the girls' school bus in Pakistan's northwestern Swat Valley in October 2012 and opened fire at Malala to punish her for championing girls' rights to education. Malala, now 16, was shot in the head while Kainat and Shazia were both wounded in the crossfire.

Malala calls on world to make education top priority

Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani schoolgirl activist who has become a world champion of girls' rights, called Friday for the World Bank to make education its top priority. Seated on a stage with World Bank President Jim Yong Kim in a one-on-one presentation in Washington, the 16-year-old delivered a poised, articulate and impassioned plea for children's education. Asked by Kim for her advice to the World Bank, Malala noted that organizations spend much of their money on health, AIDS and other programs.

Malala calls on world to make education top priority

Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani schoolgirl activist who has become a world champion of girls' rights, called Friday for the World Bank to make education its top priority. Seated on a stage with World Bank President Jim Yong Kim in a one-on-one presentation in Washington, the 16-year-old Malala delivered a poised, articulate and impassioned plea for children's education. Asked by Kim for her advice to the World Bank, Malala noted that organizations spend much of their money on health, AIDS and other programs.

Malala calls on world to make education top priority

Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani schoolgirl activist who has become a world champion of girls' rights, called Friday for the World Bank to make education its top priority. Seated on a stage with World Bank President Jim Yong Kim in a one-on-one presentation in Washington, the 16-year-old Malala delivered a poised, articulate and impassioned plea for children's education. Asked by Kim for her advice to the World Bank, Malala noted that organizations spend much of their money on health, AIDS and other programs.

Pakistani Taliban "delighted" Malala missed out on Nobel

The Pakistani Taliban said Friday they were "delighted" Malala Yousafzai, the teenage education activist they tried to kill, missed out on the Nobel Peace Prize. The Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) shot Malala in the head on her school bus on October 9 last year for speaking out against them. After the shooting she was flown to Britain for specialist care and made a remarkable recovery, going on to become a global ambassador for children's rights.

Malala, survivor of Taliban, resented in Pakistan hometown

By Mehreen Zahra-Malik MINGORA, Pakistan (Reuters) - For many of her compatriots, Malala Yousafzai is a stooge of the United States and a CIA agent, a symbol of the West's evils and a global conspiracy to bring down her native Pakistan. She has won the European Union's prestigious human rights award and was one of the favorites to win the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday, but in her native Swat valley, friends and neighbors reacted with a mixture of resentment, fear and jealousy.

Malala a 'powerful symbol of hope': World Bank chief

World Bank President Jim Yong Kim on Thursday called Malala Yousafzai, who survived an assassination attempt for her campaign for girls' schooling, a symbol of hope and courage for the world's children. "For the 400 million children still living in extreme poverty -- including far too many girls and boys who are not in school -- Malala is a powerful symbol of hope," Kim said. "She would not be denied. These children also should not be denied a good education and greater opportunity in life."

Malala has done 'nothing' to earn rights prize

The Pakistani Taliban Thursday said teenage activist Malala Yousafzai had done "nothing" to deserve a prestigious EU rights award and vowed to try again to kill her. The European Parliament awarded the Sakharov human rights prize to the 16-year-old, who has become a global ambassador for the right of all children to go to school since surviving a Taliban murder attempt. Malala survived being shot in the head by a Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) gunman on October 9 last year and is seen as a leading contender for the Nobel Peace prize, to be announced on Friday.
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