Connect to share and comment

Japan WWII soldier who hid in jungle until 1974 dies

A Japanese soldier who hid in the Philippine jungle for three decades, refusing to believe World War II was over until his former commander returned and ordered him to surrender, has died in Tokyo aged 91. Hiroo Onoda waged a guerilla campaign in Lubang Island near Luzon until he was finally persuaded in 1974 that peace had broken out, ignoring leaflet drops and successive attempts to convince him the Imperial Army had been defeated. He died in a Tokyo hospital on Thursday of heart failure.

Japan WWII soldier who hid in jungle until 1974 dies

A Japanese soldier who hid in the Philippine jungle for three decades, refusing to believe World War II was over until his former commander returned and persuaded him to surrender, has died in Tokyo aged 91. Hiroo Onoda waged a guerilla campaign in Lubang Island near Luzon until he was finally persuaded in 1974 that peace had broken out.

Japan WWII soldier who hid in jungle until 1974, dies

A Japanese soldier who hid in the Philippine jungle for three decades because he did not believe World War II was over, has died in Tokyo aged 91. Hiroo Onoda waged a guerilla campaign in Lubang Island near Luzon until he was finally persuaded in 1974 that peace had broken out. Leaflet drops and other efforts to convince him the Imperial Army had been defeated were unsuccessful, and it was only a visit from his former commanding officer, who ordered him to lay down his arms, that brought an end to his war.

1945 Tokyo bombing was against humanitarian principles: Japan gov't

The U.S. bombing of Tokyo in March 1945 that claimed some 100,000 lives ran counter to the humanitarian principles of international law, the Japanese government said in a document released Tuesday. At the day's Cabinet meeting, the government of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe endorsed the document prepared in response to a written question filed by Mizuho Fukushima, leader of the opposition Social Democratic Party and a member of the House of Councillors or the upper house.

ANALYSIS-China and Japan seek to dial down tensions, but risks remain

By Linda Sieg and John Ruwitch TOKYO/SHANGHAI, Feb 4 (Reuters) - Two Japanese F-15s scramble as a Chinese plane nears the disputed islands: one in the lead, the other providing cover. They issue radio warnings to leave the area, but are ignored. Visual wing-tipping signals go unheeded. The Japanese pilots consider their last option: firing warning shots - a step Beijing could consider an act of war.
Syndicate content