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Liechtenstein manhunt seeks suspect in fatal shooting of CEO of Bank Frick

GENEVA - Police in Liechtenstein launched a manhunt Monday for a former fund manager suspected of shooting to death a 48-year-old CEO in a bank's underground parking garage. The police said in a statement that the suspected shooter, Juergen Hermann of Liechtenstein, had fled the scene in the village of Balzers in a white-and-grey Smart car. Swiss broadcaster SRF identified the victim as Juergen Frick, the chief executive officer of Bank Frick, based in Balzers.

CEO of Liechtenstein's Bank Frick killed in car park: Swiss media

ZURICH (Reuters) - The chief executive officer of Liechtenstein private bank Frick was shot dead in the underground car park of the bank's headquarters in the tiny Alpine principality on Monday, Swiss broadcaster SRF reported on its website. Liechtenstein police said a 48-year-old man had been shot dead in the car park of a bank in the village of Balzers near the Swiss-Liechtenstein border early on Monday, without giving his name or that of the bank.

Liechtenstein 'Robin Hood' believed dead after banker shooting

Police in Liechtenstein said Monday that a self-styled "Robin Hood" suspected of killing a banker in a financial feud is believed to have committed suicide, but that efforts to locate him continued. Liechtenstein police said officers had found Juergen Hermann's driving licence and his passport, the latter containing a hand-written note in which he confessed to the shooting and bid farewell to the world. Sniffer dogs followed a trail to the bank of the River Rhine, where the suspect's clothes were found.

Manhunt for 'Robin Hood' after Liechtenstein banker shooting

Police in Liechtenstein launced a manhunt on Monday for a self-styled "Robin Hood" financier who is the prime suspect in the killing of a banker in the tiny Alpine principality. Liechtenstein police said that Juergen Hermann was considered armed and dangerous. His getaway car had been found abandoned in the countryside near the River Rhine in the north of the country and the Swiss and Austrian borders. Hermann is believed to have killed banker Juergen Frick -- the boss of Liechtenstein's Bank Frick -- in a feud over money.

Liechtenstein closes its only maternity ward

Liechtenstein will close its only maternity ward, where some 200 babies are born each year, after all the gynaecologists working there quit at the same time, the government said Wednesday. "The government regrets the closure of the maternity ward," Health Minister Mauro Pedrazzini said in a statement. The doctors had decided to leave amid uncertainty over the future of the establishment, the authorities in the tiny landlocked country between Switzerland and Austria explained, saying the ward would close for good during the spring.

Liechtenstein closes its only maternity ward

Liechtenstein will close its only maternity ward, where some 200 babies are born each year, after all the gynaecologists working there quit at the same time, the government said Wednesday. "The government regrets the closure of the maternity ward," Health Minister Mauro Pedrazzini said in a statement. The doctors had decided to leave amid uncertainty over the future of the establishment, the authorities in the tiny landlocked country between Switzerland and Austria explained, saying the ward would close for good during the spring.

Liechtenstein bank pays millions to settle US tax dispute

Liechtenstein's oldest bank said Tuesday it would pay nearly $25 million to settle a dispute with US tax authorities over its suspected role in helping clients dodge US taxes. "Liechtensteinische Landesbank AG, Vaduz, (LLB Vaduz) has reached a definitive solution to the US taxation dispute," the bank said in a statement. After months of negotiations, it said it had agreed to hand over $23.8 million (18 million euros) to US authorities, which in turn will refrain from any legal actions against the bank, it said.

NY prosecutor: Liechtenstein bank to pay $23.8M for helping US taxpayers dodge taxes

NEW YORK, N.Y. - A Liechtenstein bank will pay $23.8 million to resolve a probe into its use of undeclared accounts to help hundreds of U.S. taxpayers dodge taxes in the United States over a 10-year period, authorities announced Tuesday. U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara in Manhattan and Liechtensteinische Landesbank AG, located in Vaduz, announced the agreement, saying the bank will forfeit $16.3 million, representing revenue it earned for maintaining the undeclared accounts, and will pay $7.5 million in restitution to the Internal Revenue Service.

Liechtenstein open to talks on automatic exchange of banking information

BERLIN - Liechtenstein's prime minister says the principality is prepared to discuss an automatic exchange of bank client information with the European Union. Adrian Hasler told German daily Handelsblatt in an interview published Monday that the tiny Alpine nation would consider following the lead of Austria and Luxembourg. The two countries have come under heavy pressure to help fellow members of the 27-nation EU crack down on tax evaders. Liechtenstein is not a member of the EU.

New Independent party rattles Liechtenstein vote

A loosely knit group of independent candidates, including a cross-dressing mechanic, surged Sunday to become Liechtenstein's third largest party in general elections that dealt a heavy loss to the prime minister's party. The brand new Independents, or DU, came out of nowhere to take 15.3 percent of the national vote and four seats in the tiny Alpine principality's 25-seat parliament, according to the official results. Its entrance into the house marks the first time the chamber will seat four parties.
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