Connect to share and comment

Diabetes research: good news for caffeine addicts?

People who boosted their coffee intake by "moderate to large" doses in a US-based study had a lower risk for adult-onset diabetes than those with stable consumption, researchers said Friday. An analysis of studies that tracked the diet and lifestyles of more than 120,000 health sector workers, showed that those who increased their daily caffeine dose by about 1.5 cups a day over a four-year period had an 11-percent lower chance in the subsequent four years of developing type 2 diabetes, the team found. This was in comparison to those whose intake remained constant.

Diabetes complications show significant decline in past two decades

By Gene Emery NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Diabetes is becoming increasingly common in the United States, but the risks of complications from the blood sugar disease have declined since 1990, according to a new study. Better preventive care for adults with diabetes contributed to a 68 percent drop in their risk of heart attacks and a 64 percent drop in deaths from high blood sugar.

Low blood sugar bad for marital bliss

Low blood sugar isn't good for marital bliss because it makes spouses more prone to anger and aggression, says a new study out Monday. The findings are based on experiments with 107 married couples asked to monitor their glucose levels before breakfast and bed every day for 21 days. In addition, researchers gave them voodoo dolls representing their significant other along with 51 pins. They were then told that, at the end each day over the three-week period, they should secretly stick pins into the dolls indicating how angry they were with their better half.

Lexicon Pharma's diabetes drug successful in mid-stage study

(Reuters) - Lexicon Pharmaceuticals Inc said its experimental drug to treat diabetes met the main goal of reducing the use of insulin at meal times in a mid-stage study on patients with type 1 diabetes. The company's shares rose about 19 percent to $1.89 in trading before the bell. Lexicon said the drug, codenamed LX4211, reduced the total dose of insulin taken by patients at meal times by 32 percent, compared with a 6 percent reduction in patients given a placebo.

Rates of diabetes during and before pregnancy way up, can harm infants: study

TORONTO - A higher proportion of women are developing diabetes during and prior to pregnancy, raising their risk of giving birth to infants with such serious birth defects as congenital heart disease, researchers say. A study published Thursday in the journal Diabetes Care found rates of both gestational and pre-gestational diabetes among Ontario women doubled between 1996 and 2010.

U.S. FDA advisers recommend Mannkind's inhaled diabetes drug Afrezza

HYATTSVILLE, Maryland (Reuters) - Mannkind Corp's inhaled diabetes drug Afrezza is safe and effective for some diabetes patients with either the type 1 or type 2 form of the disease, U.S. health advisers said on Tuesday in recommending its approval for sales in the United States. The Food and Drug Administration's advisory panel, in a 13-1 vote, backed the rapid-acting insulin treatment for adults with type 1 diabetes despite lingering concerns over long-term safety and data that showed the drug did not work any better than traditional insulin.

App, doctor pep talks lower diabetes patients' blood sugar

By Ronnie Cohen NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Dr. Guillaume Charpentier believes a smartphone app he is testing on people with diabetes in France works best when it alerts doctors that frustrated patients need help managing their disease.

Failure to shed baby weight can lead to heart disease, diabetes long term: study

TORONTO - Women who don't lose all their "baby weight" within the first year after giving birth could be setting themselves up for diabetes, heart disease or a stroke later in life, new research suggests. In a study published Tuesday in the journal Diabetes Care, Toronto researchers found women who maintained excess pounds between three and 12 months postpartum had elevated risk factors for diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

B.C. covers cost of insulin pumps for Type 1 diabetics up to age 25

VICTORIA - Young British Columbians who monitor their Type 1 diabetes with an insulin pump will now get PharmaCare coverage for the equipment until they're 25 — up from the current age of 18. Health Minister Terry Lake says the province will cover up to $6,600 of the cost and that the average price of an insulin pump is about $6,500. Since 2008, PharmaCare has provided coverage of insulin pumps for patients up to age 18 after they've been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes or other forms of the disease requiring insulin.

B.C. covers cost of insulin pumps for Type 1 diabetics up to age 25

VICTORIA - Young British Columbians who monitor their Type 1 diabetes with an insulin pump will now get PharmaCare coverage for the equipment until they're 25 — up from the current age of 18. Health Minister Terry Lake says the province will cover up to $6,600 of the cost and that the average price of an insulin pump is about $6,500. Since 2008, PharmaCare has provided coverage of insulin pumps for patients up to age 18 after they've been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes or other forms of the disease requiring insulin.
Syndicate content