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NAFTA could be open for discussion, Harper hints during trade talk

VANCOUVER - With the ink still wet on a free-trade deal with South Korea, Prime Minister Stephen Harper says Canada would be willing to reopen the North American Free Trade Agreement for the right price. Harper stopped in Vancouver on his way home from South Korea on Wednesday, wasting no time in selling the new agreement.

This week's hot trend in Washington: dissing NAFTA for political gain

WASHINGTON - There's been lots of talk this week from the U.S. administration about NAFTA's shortcomings and the ways it can be fixed. Make no mistake: this talk is about the next trade deal, not the last one. The president and some of his allies have been pointing to perceived faults with the North American Free Trade Agreement, not in a bid to rip up the 20-year-old deal but in an effort to sell the idea that the Trans-Pacific Partnership might make things better. The target of that sales job: the administration's own allies in Congress.

Obama in Mexico for less friendly 'three amigos' talks

US President Barack Obama arrived in Mexico on Wednesday for a North American summit with the Mexican and Canadian leaders focused on trade but marked by frictions between the "three amigos." Obama landed in Toluca, near Mexico City, for the day of talks with Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto and Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper in an ornate government palace. The partners of the 20-year-old North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) are locked in several thorny disputes likely to surface in the talks and at a joint news conference at day's end.

White House counters attacks on free trade deals

The White House moved Tuesday to fend off liberal criticism of its efforts to seal two new giant free trade pacts, saying the deals would benefit US workers and protect the environment. Under attack from its core liberal support base over the Trans-Pacific Partnership and the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, President Barack Obama's key negotiator defended the efforts, but promised more transparency over the details of the talks.

White House counters attacks on free trade deals

The White House moved Tuesday to fend off liberal criticism of its efforts to seal two new giant free trade pacts, saying the deals would benefit US workers and protect the environment. Under attack from its core liberal support base over the Trans-Pacific Partnership and the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, President Barack Obama's key negotiator defended the efforts, but promised more transparency over the details of the talks.

Obama's 2008 promise to reopen NAFTA gets trotted out again in Washington

WASHINGTON - A controversial six-year-old campaign promise by Barack Obama to renegotiate NAFTA made a re-appearance Tuesday. The president's trade secretary said that renegotiation is precisely what's happening right now with the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the ongoing attempt at a major 12-country trade deal. Michael Froman said the ongoing talks are allowing the president to make good on his 2008 promise to reopen the old North American Free Trade Agreement to improve labour and environmental standards.

U.S. trade relationships need an 'upgrade': Pritzker

By Christine Murray and Julia Symmes Cobb MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and other U.S. trade relationships are outdated and need an "upgrade", U.S. Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker said on Tuesday during a trade visit to Mexico.

U.S., Mexico dismiss "reopening" NAFTA

Washington, Jan 17 (EFE).- U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Mexican counterpart Jose Antonio Meade dismissed here Friday the possibility of "reopening" the North American Free Trade Agreement, calling instead for steps to reinforce the 20-year-old pact. "I don't think you have to open up NAFTA, per se, in order to achieve what we're trying to achieve," Kerry said during a joint press conference in Washington with Meade and Canadian Foreign Minister John Baird. Meade seconded Kerry's view.

The smallest economy, Mexico has emerged as biggest winner of NAFTA deal

OTTAWA - Ross Perot may have had it right after all about who would win under NAFTA. The North American Free Trade Deal was an important step for all three members, but the evidence points to Mexico — at the time the weak sister in the group that included two G7 economies, the United States and Canada — as by far the biggest winner. On the 20th anniversary of the pact, Mexico — in 1994, an insular, economic basket case — has in two decades emerged as a forward-looking country with expanding global reach, a handful of world-class corporations and a ballooning middle class.

NAFTA tribunal finds 'open questions' about Canada's polar bear protections

OTTAWA - A NAFTA tribunal has ruled that "central open questions" remain unanswered about Canada's enforcement of its own law when it comes to polar bears, and is seeking a full factual record of the government's behaviour. The ruling, tabled last month but largely overlooked by Canadian news organizations, marks the second-to-last step in an exhaustive process that began with a complaint in 2011 by the U.S.-based Center for Biological Diversity.
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