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S. Korean military testing U.K.-made, multipurpose radars

SEOUL, April 10 (Yonhap) -- South Korea has introduced 24 multi-purpose radars from Britain and has been conducting combat experiments as part of efforts to step up its air defense, a military source said Thursday. In the wake of recent border incursions by suspected North Korean spy drones that have emerged as a new security challenge, the Seoul government has been mulling introducing ground surveillance radars for deployment in front-line areas and northwestern border islands.

The disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 shows world how much and little tech can do

NEW YORK, N.Y. - The disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 has presented two tales of modern technology. The limitations of tracking and communications devices allowed the plane to vanish from sight for nearly three weeks. But satellites' advanced capabilities have provided hope that the mystery won't go unsolved.

The disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 shows world how much and little tech can do

NEW YORK, N.Y. - The disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 has presented two tales of modern technology. The limitations of tracking and communications devices allowed the plane to vanish from sight for nearly three weeks. But satellites' advanced capabilities have provided hope that the mystery won't go unsolved.

U.S. Navy plans competition for next-generation missile

By Andrea Shalal WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Navy on Wednesday said it planned to launch an open competition around fiscal 2017 for a next-generation missile, seeking to reassure weapons makers they still have prospects after a separate deal with Lockheed Martin Corp for 90 air-launched missiles sparked a formal protest. Navy acquisition chief Sean Stackley told reporters the Lockheed program was limited in scope and the future, bigger missile development program would be open to all potential bidders.

Planning could hold key to disappearance of Flight MH370

By Siva Govindasamy and Tim Hepher KUALA LUMPUR (Reuters) - Whether by accident or design, whoever reached across the dimly lit cockpit of a Malaysia Airlines jet and clicked off a transponder to make Flight MH370 vanish from controllers' radars flew into a navigational and technical black hole.

Malaysia asks for broad international help in jet hunt

By Tim Hepher and Anshuman Daga KUALA LUMPUR (Reuters) - Malaysia has appealed for help and international coordination in a search for its missing passenger jet that stretches across two corridors from the Caspian Sea to the southern Indian Ocean, diplomats said on Sunday. Malaysian officials briefed envoys from 22 countries on the progress of the investigation after calling off a search in the South China Sea for the jet that vanished from radar screens more than a week ago, with 239 people on board.

Malaysian plane saga highlights air defense gaps

By Peter Apps and Frank Jack Daniel LONDON/NEW DELHI (Reuters) - Whatever truly happened to missing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370, its apparently unchallenged wanderings through Asian skies point to major gaps in regional - and perhaps wider - air defences. More than a decade after al Qaeda hijackers turned airliners into weapons on September 11, 2001, a large commercial aircraft completely devoid of stealth features appeared to vanish with relative ease.

Data suggests 'skilled' flyer turned jet: Malaysia official

Malaysian officials now believe that missing Malaysia Airlines flight 370 may have been deliberately turned towards the Indian Ocean by someone with up-to-date knowledge of flying and radar positions, a senior military official told AFP Saturday. The comments lend credence to growing suspicions that the plane, which disappeared a week ago with 239 passengers and crew, might have been commandeered.

ESA successfully tests Spanish radar for finding space junk

Paris, Feb 26 (EFE).- The European Space Agency, or ESA, said it successfully tested a prototype radar system in Santorcaz, a town located 30 kilometers (18 miles) outside Madrid, designed to find space junk that could damage military, commercial and civilian satellites. "This new sensor - active since last November - has key technologies for detecting low-orbit space debris and marks an important step toward operational radars," the ESA said in a statement.

ESA successfully tests Spanish radar for finding space junk

Paris, Feb 26 (EFE).- The European Space Agency, or ESA, said it successfully tested a prototype radar system in Santorcaz, a town located 30 kilometers (18 miles) outside Madrid, designed to find space junk that could damage military, commercial and civilian satellites. "This new sensor - active since last November - has key technologies for detecting low-orbit space debris and marks an important step toward operational radars," the ESA said in a statement.
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