Connect to share and comment

Troubled Mideast peace effort compounds U.S. policy woes in region

By Matt Spetalnick and William Maclean WASHINGTON/RIYADH (Reuters) - Addressing the United Nations General Assembly in September, President Barack Obama declared the pursuit of Israeli-Palestinian peace one of the two main U.S. foreign policy priorities for his second term. Fast-forward to today, the Obama administration faces a stark choice: expend more energy on a faltering peace process or absorb the hit to an already-troubled record in the Middle East and walk away from negotiations.

Amari expects significant progress at Japan-U.S. TPP talks

Japan's minister in charge of the Trans-Pacific Partnership free trade talks said he expects "significant progress" to be made at Japan-U.S. working-level talks slated to begin Tuesday in Washington. Tokyo and Washington should try to fill gaps "as much as possible" before a planned summit in Tokyo in April, when U.S. President Barack Obama will visit Japan and other Asian countries, Akira Amari told a press conference.

British cuts limiting military partnership with US

Britain's military cuts mean it will no longer be able to be a full partner alongside United States forces, former US defence secretary Robert Gates said Thursday. Gates, who served under US presidents Barack Obama and George W. Bush, said Britain no longer had the complete spectrum of capabilities, meaning its relationship with the US military was shifting. The comments suggest Britain's military downsizing could have a negative impact on the "special relationship" between Washington and London.

Kerry says two century US LatAm policy over

US Secretary of State John Kerry on Monday declared that a nearly 200-year-old policy which had governed Washington's relations with Latin America was finally dead. Known as the Monroe Doctrine after it was adopted in 1823 by former US president James Monroe, the policy had stated that any efforts by European countries to colonize land in North or South America would be views as aggressive acts and could require US intervention.

In pursuit of American humility

By Iam Bremmer (Reuters) - This week, as Washington navel-gazed its way into a shutdown, its actions didn't go unnoticed abroad. In Turkey, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the Prime Minister of Turkey, took the opportunity to gloat about the U.S.'s refusal to pay its federal workers, many of whom are on furlough because of the shutdown. "We are now witnessing the crisis in the U.S. We have never been a government that could not pay its personnel," Erdogan said.

In pursuit of American humility

By Ian Bremmer This week, as Washington navel-gazed its way into a shutdown, its actions didn't go unnoticed abroad. In Turkey, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the Prime Minister of Turkey, took the opportunity to gloat about the U.S.'s refusal to pay its federal workers, many of whom are on furlough because of the shutdown. "We are now witnessing the crisis in the U.S. We have never been a government that could not pay its personnel," Erdogan said.

Obama to host Cameron on Monday: White House

US President Barack Obama will meet British Prime Minister David Cameron at the White House on Monday to discuss Syria and the G8 summit next month in Northern Ireland, officials said. "The prime minister's visit underscores the special relationship between the United States and the United Kingdom that has been crucial in advancing our shared security and prosperity," a White House statement said. The statement said that in addition to Syria and the G8, the talks would include discussion on trade and economic cooperation and counterterrorism measures.

Bolivia expels U.S. Agency for International Development

La Paz, May 1 (EFE).- President Evo Morales on Wednesday expelled the U.S. Agency for International Development from Bolivia, accusing USAID of meddling in politics. He announced the decision at a May Day rally in La Paz's Murillo Square. Since taking office in 2006, Morales has traditionally chosen International Workers Day to announce the nationalization of a firm or the assertion of public control over infrastructure or natural resources.

U.S. immigration bill increases visas for skilled workers, tightens rules

By Patrick Temple-West WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Senate immigration bill outlined Tuesday attempts to meet long-sought demands from America's technology sector for more high-skilled workers from abroad to fill the gap created by a shortage of American candidates. Under the proposed bipartisan legislation outlined Tuesday, the official quota of "H1-B" visas for high-skilled, foreign workers would increase by 69 percent to 110,000.

Factbox - Major provisions of U.S. Senate immigration reform bill

By Richard Cowan (Reuters) - A bipartisan group of eight senators on Tuesday unveiled an outline of legislation to revamp U.S. immigration policy for the first time since 1986. The proposal has three overriding goals: to create a path to legal status and ultimately citizenship for millions of undocumented immigrants; to secure U.S. borders against illegal entry; and to make it easier for industry, particularly high-tech industry and agriculture, to hire workers from abroad when needed.
Syndicate content