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Hungary's Orban retains two-thirds legislative majority

Hungary's Prime Minister Viktor Orban retained his controlling two-thirds majority in parliament following last week's election, a final ballot count revealed early Sunday, giving him free legislative rein for the next four years. "(Orban's ruling) Fidesz party won a two-thirds parliamentary majority at the April 6 election," a statement published by state news agency MTI read, although the results can still be appealed. The result was based on 99.99 percent of votes counted by the national election office, MTI said. pmu/pvh

Hungary's Orban retains two-thirds legislative majority

Hungary's Prime Minister Viktor Orban retained his controlling two-thirds majority in parliament following last week's election, a final ballot count revealed early Sunday, giving him free legislative rein for the next four years. "(Orban's ruling) Fidesz party won a two-thirds parliamentary majority at the April 6 election," a statement published by state news agency MTI read, although the results can still be appealed. The result was based on 99.99 percent of votes counted by the national election office, MTI said. pmu/pvh

Orban had 'undue advantage' in Hungary vote

Hungary's Prime Minister Viktor Orban had an "undue advantage" as he romped to victory in weekend elections, thanks to amended election rules and one-sided media coverage, international election observers said Monday. In general elections on Sunday, Orban and his centre-right Fidesz party won 44.5 percent of the vote, far ahead of the 26 percent taken by the fractious centre-left alliance.

Hungary's Viktor Orban: a strongman who hates to lose

Re-elected Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban, the shaggy-haired student dissident turned clean-cut strongman, hates coming second. "He doesn't like losing," Aniko Levai, Orban's wife and cookbook-writing mother of his five children, confided to a women's magazine recently. And while his beloved Hungarian football team seldom wins, Orban usually does -- as was the case on Sunday when his party cruised to victory.

Hungary opposition seeks to prove polls wrong

The chief candidate of Hungary's rickety centre-left opposition alliance predicted Saturday on the eve of elections that he would defy the opinion polls and defeat Prime Minister Viktor Orban. "I don't care about the polls, people are afraid of expressing their views," Attila Mesterhazy, head of the Socialist party and the alliance's joint candidate for premier, told AFP. "I believe I will be prime minister in a few days," Mesterhazy said at a rally of around 200 people in a communist-era housing estate in the capital Budapest.

From communism to Orban, Hungary at a glance

Hungarians will vote in a general election Sunday, with Prime Minister Viktor Orban expected to romp to victory after a rollercoaster four years that have seen him labelled both despot and saviour. Herewith some key facts about the landlocked central European country, smaller than Greece but bigger than Ireland, bordering seven countries including Austria to the west and Romania and Ukraine to the east.

Orban banks on Hungary's 'fairy tale' economy for re-election

As Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban runs for re-election next weekend he has been trumpeting an economy that appears to be doing rather well -- at first glance. The central European former communist country emerged from recession last year, with output expanding a healthy 1.2 percent and forecast to grow by 2.0 percent in 2014. Unemployment, at 8.9 percent, is at a five-year low while inflation -- in 2012 one of the highest in the European Union -- has slowed to levels not seen for more than four decades.

PM Orban's home village speaks volumes about Hungary

For both critics and fans of Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban, the village where he grew up says a lot about the man tipped to be re-elected early next month and his style of government. Since Orban swept to power in 2010, neat and tidy Felcsut, nestled in the rolling hills of Transdanubia in central Hungary has undergone a metamorphosis. Its schools, church and houses have all been spruced up, the streets are spotless and Felcsut, population 1,750, sports a brand new cultural centre since February.

Hungary to ignore critics with landslide for Orban

By Gergely Szakacs and Christian Lowe BATONYTERENYE, Hungary (Reuters) - Barring a major upset, Hungarians will enthusiastically re-elect Prime Minister Viktor Orban and his Fidesz party for another term in April. To outsiders who see an authoritarian troublemaker, the expected landslide looks odd. Not to those who know what motivates him.

Hungary opposition scraps rally due to weather

Hungary's opposition, trailing badly behind Prime Minister Viktor Orban's Fidesz party, suffered a fresh blow on Saturday when high winds forced it to scrap a major pre-election rally. With weeks before a poll Orban said would be "destiny-deciding", organisers called off the demonstration, which had been expected to draw tens of thousands to central Budapest. Organisers had hoped the rally would provide a boost to the so-called "government-changing" alliance of centre-left parties in its troubled bid to oust the governing right-wing Fidesz party in the April 6 vote.
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