Connect to share and comment

Suspect arrested in murder of Tunisian MP

Tunisian security forces arrested a suspect in the murder of opposition politician Mohamed Brahmi after a fierce gunbattle during an overnight raid on a militant hideout, the interior ministry's spokesman said Sunday. Brahimi was the second of two opposition politicians to have been assassinated last year by suspected jihadists as Islamist violence rocked the North African country, which was the birthplace of the Arab Spring revolutions in 2011.

Suspect arrested in murder of Tunisian MP

Tunisian security forces engaged in a gunbattle overnight Saturday as they arrested a suspect in last July's murder of opposition politician Mohamed Brahmi, the interior ministry's spokesman said. Brahimi was the second of two opposition politicians to have been assassinated last year by suspected jihadists as Islamist violence rocked the North African country, which was the birthplace of the Arab Spring revolutions in 2011.

Suspect arrested in murder of Tunisian MP

Tunisian security forces engaged in a gunbattle overnight Saturday as they arrested a suspect in last July's murder of opposition politician Mohamed Brahmi, the interior ministry's spokesman said. Brahimi was the second of two opposition politicians to have been assassinated last year by suspected jihadists as Islamist violence rocked the North African country, which was the birthplace of the Arab Spring revolutions in 2011.

Tunisia's Islamists compromise to secure legacy

Tunisia's ruling Islamists have opted for a strategy of compromise on the thorniest aspects of the future constitution to save their political legacy, challenged by social unrest and elections this year, analysts say. Unlike its Egyptian counterpart the Muslim Brotherhood, also elected after a popular uprising in 2011 but deposed by the army last year and outlawed, Ennahda has survived a succession of crises and is set to step down to ensure a peaceful transition.

Unrest rises in Tunisia after Islamists kill police officers

By Anis Milli and Tarek Amara KEF, Tunisia (Reuters) - Tunisian security forces fired tear gas on Thursday to disperse hundreds of people trying to storm a local government building as demonstrations broke out over the killing of seven policemen by Islamist militants. Tensions are rising in Tunisia, where the ruling moderate Islamist Ennahda party and opposition have been trying to start talks to end a paralyzing deadlock since the assassination of two secular opposition leaders earlier this year.

5 hurt in attack on Tunisian ruling Islamists' office

Protesters attacked an office of Tunisia's embattled ruling Islamist party in the town of Beja on Thursday, leaving five party members wounded, Ennahda official Abdessatar Amdouni told local radio. Among the wounded, "one suffered a leg fractured leg and another face burns," he told Shems FM, speaking of "hundreds or thousands" of assailants in the town west of Tunis. It was the second such attack on Thursday, after an Ennahda office in the town of Kef was ransacked by protesters. ms-alf/sma/al

Relief, distrust as Tunisia Islamists agree to quit govt

The ruling Tunisian Islamist party Ennahda's pledge to stand down in favour of a government of independents has prompted both relief and distrust among observers and members of the opposition. Despite Saturday's agreement aimed at ending a months-long political deadlock, some already fear that Ennahda may try to renege on the deal. Saturday's roadmap signed by Ennahda chief Rached Ghannouchi was brokered to end a crisis sparked by the murder in July of opposition MP Mohamed Brahmi.

Tunisia crisis talks hang in balance

The launch of a hard-won dialogue between Tunisia's ruling Islamists and the opposition to end a protracted political crisis was in jeopardy Saturday because of a last-minute dispute, delegates said. The dispute emerged as delegates started to gather at the Palais des Congres for a symbolic ceremony during which the ruling moderate Islamist party Ennahda was to declare its readiness to resign.

Tunisian government and opponents to start talks Saturday

By Tarek Amara TUNIS (Reuters) - Tunisia's ruling Islamists and their secular opponents will start three weeks of negotiations on Saturday to allow the government to step down and make way for a caretaker cabinet until elections, a labor union mediating the talks said. The moderate Islamist Ennahda party agreed at the weekend to a deal under which the government would resign after the talks as a way to end months of political deadlock in the country where the Arab Spring uprisings began.

Tunisia political dialogue to start Saturday

Direct negotiations between Tunisia's ruling Islamist party Ennahda and the opposition to resolve a months-old political crisis sparked by the assassination of an opposition MP will begin on Saturday, mediators announced Thursday. "The national dialogue meeting will take place next Saturday at the Palais des Congres" in Tunis, the country's main UGTT trade union said on its Facebook page. Ennahda confirmed that a date to begin the talks had finally been agreed, after its leader, Rachid Ghannouchi, met UGTT's secretary general Houcine Abassi.
Syndicate content