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WikiLeaks' Assange fears U.S., says will stay in embassy

By Andrew Osborn LONDON (Reuters) - WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange says he will not leave the sanctuary of the Ecuadorean Embassy in London even if Sweden stops pursuing sexual assault claims against him because he fears arrest on the order of the United States.

Assange marks one year holed up in London embassy

A year after seeking refuge at the Ecuadorian embassy in London, Julian Assange remains fearful of US "revenge" over the WikiLeaks disclosures and aware that the diplomatic deadlock over his case may continue for months, if not years. "All I ask is to be treated like a normal person and not have the politics affect judicial decisions," said the Australian ahead of the anniversary Wednesday of his confinement. Assange was arrested in London on December 7, 2010, on a warrant issued by Sweden, where he is wanted for questioning for the alleged sexual assault of two women.

Assange marks one year holed up in London embassy

A year after seeking refuge at the Ecuadorian embassy in London, Julian Assange remains fearful of US "revenge" over the WikiLeaks disclosures and aware that the diplomatic deadlock over his case may continue for months, if not years. "All I ask is to be treated like a normal person and not have the politics affect judicial decisions," said the Australian ahead of the anniversary Wednesday of his confinement. Assange was arrested in London on December 7, 2010, on a warrant issued by Sweden, where he is wanted for questioning for the alleged sexual assault of two women.

Ecuador and Britain fail to break Assange deadlock

Ecuador said on Monday it will continue to grant asylum to WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange at its London embassy after talks with Britain failed to achieve a breakthrough in the case. Foreign Minister Ricardo Patino said the Australian was prepared to stay at the embassy for another five years if necessary until a diplomatic solution was found, insisting there were no plans to smuggle him out "in the boot of a car". Patino was speaking after talks with British Foreign Secretary William Hague in London ahead of the anniversary on Wednesday of Assange's flight to the embassy.

Assange hosts Ecuadorian foreign minister at London haven

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange made a fleeting public appearance on Sunday as he welcomed the Ecuadorian foreign minister to his refuge at the South American country's embassy in London. Ricardo Patino said Assange was in "good spirits" despite the "limitations" of his accommodation. The foreign minister is in Britain for a meeting with counterpart William Hague to try and find a solution to the impasse which has led to Assange spending one year in the embassy in a bid to avoid extradition to Sweden.

Britain's threat to nab Assange almost broke ties

Britain's threat to enter Ecuador's embassy in London to nab WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange strained bilateral ties to the point of breaking but relations are now good, a top diplomat said Sunday. Bilateral "ties really reached a critical point when (last August) there was an inappropriate threat to invade Ecuadoran territory, violating the diplomatic legation, seeking Mr Assange's capture," Ecuadoran Deputy Foreign Minister Marco Albuja said in a phone interview.

Julian Assange: a year in the embassy

It is an odd sight: WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is wearing a jacket and tie, but no shoes. Then again, if you have not stepped outside Ecuador's London embassy for a year, shoes are largely pointless.

Ecuador's top diplomat to visit Assange

Ecuadoran Foreign Minister Ricardo Patino said Wednesday he would travel to London to meet with WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, living at Ecuador's embassy for nearly a year to avoid extradition. Patino told the ECTV public television channel that he would deliver asylum documents to Assange during the visit, his first with the anti-secrecy activist. "We want to be cautious, but it's time to visit him and tell him that he will continue to have our protection and support," Patino added.

Assange condemns 'show trial' of US soldier

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange on Tuesday condemned the "show trial" of Bradley Manning, the US soldier accused of helping Al-Qaeda by leaking a hoard of secret files to the whistleblowing website. In a statement posted on the WikiLeaks site, Assange said the court martial which began near Washington on Monday did not represent justice for the 25-year-old army private. "This is not justice; never could this be justice. The verdict was ordained long ago," he wrote. "Its function is not to determine questions such as guilt or innocence, or truth or falsehood.

Wikileaks documentary spotlights complexity of Julian Assange

By Zorianna Kit LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Wikileaks founder Julian Assange may claim to be a champion of transparency, but when an Oscar-winning filmmaker wanted to shine a light on his rise to fame after publishing secret U.S. diplomatic cables on his website, Assange was none too pleased. Alex Gibney set out to uncover the story behind Assange, 41, and the website he founded in 2006 to leak classified information submitted by anonymous sources, but received little cooperation from the former computer hacker.
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