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Russia puts protest leader Navalny under house arrest

A Moscow court on Friday ordered Russian protest leader Alexei Navalny to be placed under house arrest and banned from using the Internet, a move he said was aimed at thwarting his fight against top-level corruption. The order came after a request from investigators probing an alleged embezzlement case which Navalny's supporters say is yet another attempt to remove one of the most dangerous foes of President Vladimir Putin from the political scene.

Russian court puts Putin foe under house arrest

MOSCOW (Reuters) - A Russian court placed opposition leader Alexei Navalny under house arrest for at least two months on Friday and barred him from using the Internet or speaking to the media. The court said Navalny, an outspoken critic of President Vladimir Putin and a leader of anti-Kremlin protests in 2011-2012, had violated rules barring him from leaving Moscow. Navalny denounced the ruling as baseless and said it was meant to silence him.

Russia protest leader Navalny placed under house arrest

A Moscow court on Friday ordered Russian protest leader Alexei Navalny to be placed under house arrest, satisfying a request from investigators probing an alleged embezzlement case. Navalny, who last year was given a suspended five year sentence in a separate timber embezzlement case, faces charges in this case along with his brother Oleg of stealing and laundering a total of 51 million rubles ($1.4 million) from cosmetics company Yves Rocher and a Russian firm. sjw/yad

Russia puts protest leader Navalny under house arrest

A Moscow court on Friday ordered Russian protest leader Alexei Navalny to be placed under house arrest after a request from investigators probing an alleged embezzlement case. Navalny, who last year was given a suspended five-year sentence in a separate timber embezzlement case, faces charges in this case along with his brother Oleg of stealing and laundering a total of 51 million rubles ($1.4 million) from cosmetics company Yves Rocher and a Russian firm.

Russia calls for house arrest of Kremlin critic Navalny

Russia's powerful Investigative Committee on Wednesday called for opposition leader Alexei Navalny to be placed under house arrest as he is probed for fraud. Navalny, a charismatic Kremlin critic who came second in last year's Moscow mayoral polls and wowed crowds at mass rallies against President Vladimir Putin, is being probed in several cases he claims are politically motivated. The Investigative Committee said Wednesday that it would ask a court to place Navalny under house arrest for violating a travel ban and committing a public order offence this week.

Russian investigators want Putin foe Navalny under house arrest

MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russian investigators have asked a court to place opposition leader Alexei Navalny under house arrest, the federal Investigative Committee said on Wednesday. Navalny, an anti-corruption blogger and opponent of President Vladimir Putin who helped lead a wave of protests in 2011-2012, is serving a five-year suspended sentence on a theft conviction he says was a Kremlin reprisal and was jailed until Monday for resisting arrest earlier this week at a rally.

Russia sentences anti-Putin activists, detains hundreds of protesters

A Russian court on Monday sentenced seven activists to prison terms of up to four years over a protest against President Vladimir Putin as police detained hundreds of supporters outside. A Moscow district court sentenced seven defendants to penal colony terms of between two-and-a-half and four years for what the judge ruled to be "mass riots" during a 2012 demonstration. The high-profile case has become a symbol of the harsh crackdown on opposition protests since Putin returned to the Kremlin.

Russia sentences anti-Putin activists, detains 200 protesters

Russian police detained hundreds of protesters Monday outside a court that sentenced seven activists to prison terms of up to four years for demonstrations against Vladimir Putin's third presidential inauguration. The Moscow court sentenced the seven defendants to penal colony terms of between two and a half and four years for what the judge ruled to be "mass riots" during the 2012 demonstrations, a high-profile case that has become a symbol of the harsh crackdown on opposition protests since Putin returned to the Kremlin.

Russia arrests 200 as court convicts anti-Putin protesters

Two hundred people were arrested Friday near a Moscow court as it convicted eight defendants of mass riots and attacking police at a protest against President Vladimir Putin, a case widely seen as a crackdown on dissent. The eight defendants were found guilty of participating in mass riots and hitting policemen at an opposition rally the day before Putin returned to the Kremlin for a third term in 2012. The guilty verdict came during the showpiece Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, which Putin helped bring to Russia for the first time.

Russian court convicts eight anti-Putin protesters

A Russian court Friday found eight people guilty of mass riots and attacking police at a 2012 protest against Vladimir Putin's third term in office. The Zamoskvoretsky district court in Moscow found the seven men and one woman guilty of participating in mass riots and using violence against police, an AFP correspondent reported. Around one thousand people stood in protest outside the heavily guarded tribunal including opposition leader Alexei Navalny, as well as two members of the Pussy Riot punk band who complained they were barred from the courtroom.
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