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Fresh Thai election no closer despite multi-party meeting

By Amy Sawitta Lefevre BANGKOK (Reuters) - Thailand's political impasse looked no closer to a solution on Tuesday despite a rare meeting of political parties and the Election Commission to discuss how and when a new vote should be held after a general election in February was declared void. About 58 parties including the ruling Puea Thai Party met in Bangkok to discuss a rerun, after months of anti-government protests that have crippled Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra's caretaker government and the economy.

Opposition no-show hinders Thai election talks

Negotiations on a roadmap to elections in Thailand following months of political turmoil suffered a major setback Tuesday as the opposition pulled out of rare multi-party talks at the last minute. Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra is pushing for new polls as soon as possible to bolster her precarious position in the face of a series of legal threats that could force her from office. The kingdom has been without a fully functioning government or parliament since December, and a general election held in February was voided after opposition demonstrators disrupted voting.

Opposition no-show hinders Thai election talks

Negotiations on a roadmap to elections in Thailand following months of political turmoil suffered a major setback Tuesday as the opposition pulled out of rare multi-party talks at the last minute. Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra is pushing for new polls as soon as possible to bolster her precarious position in the face of a series of legal threats that could force her from office. The kingdom has been without a fully functioning government or parliament since December, and a general election held in February was voided after opposition demonstrators disrupted voting.

Thailand's fractious parties to discuss new elections

Thailand's quarrelling political parties are to meet Tuesday to discuss a roadmap to fresh elections following months of deadly street protests aimed at toppling Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra. The kingdom has been without a fully functioning government or parliament since December, and an election held in February was declared invalid after opposition demonstrators disrupted voting. The Southeast Asian nation has been shaken by months of political violence that has left 25 people dead and hundreds wounded, including many protesters, in grenade attacks and shootings.

Opposition no-show hinders Thai election talks

Talks between Thailand's quarrelling political parties on a roadmap to elections following months of deadly political turmoil ended with no breakthrough Tuesday after the opposition pulled out at the last minute. Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra is pushing for new polls as soon as possible to bolster her precarious position in the face of a series of legal threats that could force her from office.

Clock ticking for Thai PM as court verdict nears

By Amy Sawitta Lefevre BANGKOK (Reuters) - A Thai court will decide this week whether to give embattled Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra more time to defend herself against charges of abuse of power, accusations that could bring her down, or whether to move swiftly to a verdict. The fate of Yingluck and her government will determine the course of politics in Thailand which is polarized between the supporters of her and her brother, ousted former premier Thaksin Shinawatra, and supporters of the royalist establishment.

One dead in shooting at Thai protest site

One person was shot dead on Tuesday at the site of an anti-government rally in the Thai capital Bangkok, emergency services said, in the latest in a string of violent attacks. The 40-year-old man was killed by an unknown attacker in the early hours of the morning near the rally stage in Lumpini Park, according to the city's Erawan emergency centre. He was working as a security guard for the anti-government movement, according to rally spokesman Akanat Promphan. "We don't know who was responsible," he added.

Beleaguered Thai PM pleads for justice, fair treatment

By Amy Sawitta Lefevre BANGKOK (Reuters) - With legal cases against her mounting, embattled Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra pleaded on Tuesday for fair and proper treatment from the national anti-corruption commission and Thailand's Constitutional Court.

Thai Red Shirts vow 'final fight' to defend Yingluck

Thailand's pro-government "Red Shirt" supporters rallied for a second day Sunday, vowing to protect Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, who is facing a slew of legal challenges that could see her toppled within weeks. Tens of thousands of Red Shirts descended on a wide road in a Bangkok suburb in a colourful and boisterous show of support for the crisis-mired premier, who has faced months of anti-government demonstrations in the Thai capital.

Thai 'Red Shirts' rally to support embattled PM

Thousands of Thai pro-government "Red Shirts" massed Saturday in a show of support for Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, warning that they would resist attempts to oust her through the courts. The rally comes as Thailand's long-running political crisis looks set to enter a new and potentially turbulent phase with the expected indictment of Yingluck -- a move likely to infuriate her supporters.
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