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EU has open mind on origin labelling as members push for horsemeat action

The European Commission said Monday it has an open mind when it comes to place of origin labels on prepared foods as several member states pushed for the measure to help combat the horsemeat for beef scandal. EU Health Commissioner Tonio Borg nonetheless said an EU report into the labelling issue -- which was in the works before the crisis broke -- would be brought forward three months so member states could review it earlier.

Nestle dumps second supplier in horsemeat scandal

Swiss food giant Nestle said Monday it had stopped using a Spanish supplier after tests determined there was horse DNA in products supposedly containing pure beef, in the latest development in a Europe-wide food-labelling scandal. "Tests have shown that one batch, supplied by Servocar, a company from Casarrubios del Monte (Toledo), contains horse DNA above the one-percent threshold likely to indicate adulteration or gross negligence," Nestle said in a statement.

Horsemeat with banned drug entered French food chain

PARIS, Feb 23 (Reuters) - Meat from three horse carcasses contaminated with a banned drug has entered the human food chain in France but there is no danger to the public, the French farm minister said on Saturday. The meat, which came from a lot of six British carcasses exported to France, contained traces of phenylbutazone - known as bute - an anti-inflammatory painkiller for sporting horses, banned for animals intended for eventual human consumption.

French firm in horsemeat scandal halts wholesale meat trade

French firm Spanghero, at the heart of the horsemeat scandal rocking Europe, said Friday it was stopping the wholesale trade of frozen meat after the agriculture ministry retained a ban following a probe. The company sparked a continental food alert by allegedly passing off 750 tonnes of horsemeat as beef, and had its sanitary licence suspended last week.

France keeps ban on firm at heart of horsemeat fraud

French firm Spanghero, at the heart of the horsemeat scandal rocking Europe, will remain barred from the wholesale trade of frozen meat, the agriculture ministry said Friday after releasing the results of a probe. The company sparked a continental food alert by allegedly passing off 750 tonnes of horsemeat as beef, and had its sanitary licence suspended last week.

UK food regulator finds another 35 positive horsemeat tests

LONDON, Feb 22 (Reuters) - Britain's food regulator said it had found another 35 positive tests for horsemeat in beef products, confirming the latest contaminations in a scandal still spreading across Europe. The Food Standards Agency (FSA) said on Friday it had conducted 3634 tests, 3599 of which had come back negative for horsemeat levels above 1 percent, with 35 results testing positive for horsemeat at or above 1 percent.

Swiss stores withdraw horsemeat after cruelty scandal

Most Swiss supermarkets on Wednesday withdrew horsemeat products from their shelves, not due to the spiralling fake labelling scandal but over allegations of cruel conditions on farms where horses are bred for meat. German discount chain Lidl told AFP it had removed all horsemeat products from its shelves in Switzerland, while the country's second largest supermarket chain, Coop, said it had withdrawn around 20 horsemeat sausage products.

Scandal brings surprise revival for horsemeat in France

By Muriel Boselli PARIS, Feb 20 (Reuters) - The rumpus in Europe over horsemeat sold as beef is bringing a bonanza for France's 700 surviving horse butchers, who are suddenly piquing consumer curiosity after years of decline. Non-stop media coverage has made eating horses a hot topic round office water coolers, boosting sales by up to 15 percent, the head of France's horse butchers' trade group said.

Britain expands "bigger than burgers" horsemeat tests

* Tests now to target ready-made meals like lasagne, ravioli * Issue "bigger than burgers", agency spokesman says LONDON, Feb 19 (Reuters) - Britain is expanding meat testing to a wider range of products, including ready-made meals, as the scandal spreads over the sale of mislabelled horsemeat, the country's food regulatory agency said on Tuesday.

British shoppers may pay high price from horsemeat scandal

By James Davey and Neil Maidment LONDON, Feb 19 (Reuters) - For Britons worried last week's beef lasagne was in fact a helping of horse, peace of mind that such a meal will never reach dining tables again may come at a price. Livestock specialists say that contrary to some public comments by supermarkets, ensuring a chain of quality from farm to table will cost money - particularly at the cheaper, ready-made meal end.
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