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Gulf deal leaves the ball in Qatar's court

Wealthy Gulf Arab states have reached a "vague" compromise to thaw tensions over the Muslim Brotherhood with Qatar which has yet to prove its good intentions, analysts say. Thursday's deal between the six Gulf Cooperation Council foreign ministers did not, however, mention the return of Saudi, Emirati, and Bahraini ambassadors withdrawn from Doha in an unprecedented move on March 5. "The ball is now in Qatar's camp," Saudi former diplomat Abdullah al-Shammari told AFP.

Gulf deal leaves the ball in Qatar's court

Wealthy Gulf Arab states have reached a "vague" compromise to thaw tensions over the Muslim Brotherhood with Qatar which has yet to prove its good intentions, analysts say. Thursday's deal between the six Gulf Cooperation Council foreign ministers did not, however, mention the return of Saudi, Emirati, and Bahraini ambassadors withdrawn from Doha in an unprecedented move on March 5. "The ball is now in Qatar's camp," Saudi former diplomat Abdullah al-Shammari told AFP.

Gulf states agree deal to end Qatar tensions

Gulf foreign ministers agreed a deal Thursday to end months of unprecedented tension between Qatar and other members of the six-nation Gulf Cooperation Council over the Muslim Brotherhood. At an extraordinary meeting in Riyadh, the ministers agreed that the policies of GCC member states should not undermine the "interests, security and stability" of each other, a statement said. Such policies must also not affect the "sovereignty" of a member state.

Gulf states agree deal to end Qatar tensions

Gulf foreign ministers on Thursday agreed on a deal to end months of unprecedented tension between Qatar and other members of the six-nation Gulf Cooperation Council, a statement said. At an extraordinary meeting in Riyadh, the ministers agreed that the policies of GCC member states should not undermine the "interests, security and stability" of each other. Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain recalled their ambassadors from Qatar last month, accusing it of meddling in their internal affairs and supporting the Muslim Brotherhood.

Kuwait hopes for remedy to Gulf row over Qatar soon

By Sylvia Westall KUWAIT (Reuters) - Kuwait expects to see "positive steps" taken in a dispute between Qatar and three other Gulf Arab states as soon as this week that may include a decision to send those countries' ambassadors back to Doha, a Kuwaiti official said on Wednesday.

Beset by differences, Arab leaders open annual summit

KUWAIT (Reuters) - Arab leaders struggling with an array of foreign policy disputes opened an annual summit on Tuesday to try to forge a common stand on Syria's war and what many of them see as the menace of Iranian-U.S. rapprochement. The gathering in Kuwait follows an unprecedented row among members of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) alliance of Gulf Arab states over Qatari support for Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood, and a verbal spat between Iraq and Saudi Arabia over violence in Iraq's Anbar province.

Syrian conflict takes centre stage at Arab summit

The Syrian conflict takes centre stage at an Arab summit starting Tuesday in Kuwait, where a regional rift over Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood has been kept off the agenda. The dispute which broke out in the runup to the summit pits Qatar against Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates. With the focus on Syria, its opposition National Coalition (NC) head Ahmad al-Jarba is due to address Arab leaders at the opening session.

U.S. drops bid to arrange Obama summit with divided Gulf states

By Matt Spetalnick WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The White House has abandoned efforts to arrange a summit with Gulf Arab leaders during President Barack Obama's visit to Saudi Arabia next week because of divisions with the group of regional U.S. allies, Obama's top national security aide said on Friday. Obama will go ahead with his scheduled talks with Saudi King Abdullah in Riyadh next Friday, at the end of a trip to Europe that is expected to be dominated by the Ukraine crisis.

Saudi demands Qatar shut down Al-Jazeera

Saudi Arabia demanded that Qatar shut down Al-Jazeera and two think tanks during a recent meeting of the Gulf Cooperation Council, a source close to someone who attended the talks told AFP Friday. Riyadh demanded the closure of the pan-Arab broadcaster as well as the Brookings Doha Center and the Arab Center for Research and Policy Studies, the source said on condition of anonymity.

Spurning Gulf Arab pressure, Qatar says foreign policy 'non-negotiable'

DOHA (Reuters) - Qatar on Monday again dismissed demands by three fellow Gulf Arab states for changes to its foreign policy, calling its independence "non-negotiable" in a further sign that it will continue to aid Islamists such as Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood. In an unprecedented move within the Gulf Cooperation Council of allied hereditary monarchies, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain recalled their ambassadors from Qatar on March 5, accusing Doha of failing to abide by an accord not to interfere in each others' internal affairs.
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