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Volkswagen's U.S. chief leaves company, Horn named replacement

By Bernie Woodall DETROIT (Reuters) - Volkswagen AG's <VOWG_p.DE> U.S. Chief Executive Officer Jonathan Browning has left the company for personal reasons and is to be replaced by 51-year-old Michael Horn, the company announced from its Wolfsburg, Germany headquarters on Thursday. Browning, 54, a former executive at General Motors Co <GM.N> and Ford Motor Co <F.N>, had been with VW since 2010. Volkswagen said on Thursday that Browning will return to Britain, where he is from.

Qatar says selling Porsche SE share, keeps VW stake

The oil-rich emirate of Qatar said on Monday it was selling its 10-percent stake in Porsche Automobil Holding SE (PSE) but would keep its 17-percent of Volkswagen, which owns the luxury brand Porsche. The sale by Qatar means that "all of Porsche SE's common stock is now again held by the Porsche and Piech families," said Porsche supervisory board chairman Wolfgang Porsche.

RPT-INSIGHT-Has Volkswagen discovered the Holy Grail of carmakers?

By Laurence Frost and Andreas Cremer and Paul Lienert BERLIN/DETROIT, Feb 11 (Reuters) - Ulrich Hackenberg isn't yet a household name but if Volkswagen's $70 billion bet on his big idea pays off, he may join the likes of Henry Ford, Alfred Sloan and Taiichi Ohno in the canon of auto industry pioneers.

INSIGHT-Has Volkswagen discovered the Holy Grail of carmakers?

By Laurence Frost and Andreas Cremer and Paul Lienert BERLIN/DETROIT, Feb 11 (Reuters) - Ulrich Hackenberg isn't yet a household name but if Volkswagen's $70 billion bet on his big idea pays off, he may join the likes of Henry Ford, Alfred Sloan and Taiichi Ohno in the canon of auto industry pioneers. Since the heyday of Henry Ford and his Model T, the world's automakers have considered the "global car" to be their Holy Grail - the same basic design that can be built, in subtle variations, and sold in different markets.
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