Connect to share and comment

Quality over quantity as English bubbly builds reputation

By Martinne Geller LONDON (Reuters) - With revelers raising a glass of bubbly to the new year, England's tiny sparkling wine industry is set for a lift in 2014 as established brands step up export plans and newcomers join the party. Internationally, England may be known for its ale, cider and gin, but it is also home to 432 vineyards and 124 wineries, mostly along the southeast coast, which has similar geology and climate to France's Champagne region across the Channel.

Wine experts say holiday champagne recession is over

By Leslie Gevirtz NEW YORK (Reuters) - After years of resorting to less costly sparkling beverages, many wine experts said they will be popping champagne corks this New Year's Eve, which could be an indication of better economic times ahead. A 2012 study by Karl Storchmann, an economics professor at New York University and managing editor of the Journal of Wine Economics, showed sales of French champagne are a fairly accurate indicator of Americans' future income.

French champagne group Moet launches 'made in India' bubbly

The world's biggest champagne house, Moet Hennessy, has launched its first "made in India" sparkling wine as it seeks to capture a young, urban and increasingly sophisticated market of drinkers on the subcontinent. The French champagne producer has invested in a new winery in Dindori near western Maharashtra state's Nashik region, regarded as India's wine-making heart. Moet, owned by French luxury goods group LVMH, launched its Chandon India NV (non-vintage) Brut last month, saying it aimed to "build the sparkling wine culture" in the country.

Champagne's Bouzy little secret

If ever there was a place destined to produce a cheeky tipple, it has to be the village of Bouzy in the champagne country of northern France. Yes, it really is pronounced "boozy" and that is not the only thing that stands out about this charming little corner of the wine world. All around stretch vineyards that produce the grapes to make the world's most prestigious sparkling wine. For as far as the eye can see, bubbles are the business, and a lucrative one at that.

Champagne's Bouzy little secret

If ever there was a place destined to produce a cheeky tipple, it has to be the village of Bouzy in the champagne country of northern France. Yes, it really is pronounced "boozy" and that is not the only thing that stands out about this charming little corner of the wine world. All around stretch vineyards that produce the grapes to make the world's most prestigious sparkling wine. For as far as the eye can see, bubbles are the business, and a lucrative one at that.

China to ban non-French 'champagne' copycats

China has agreed to limit the "champagne" label to only wines produced in the French region bearing that name, with a trade group welcoming the move as a boost for the beverage in a fast-growing market. Sales of the wine are accelerating in the world's second largest economy, from 50,000 bottles in 2001 to one million in 2010 to two million last year, making it the fifth-largest market outside the European Union.

Champagne celebrations turn to prosecco in frugal Britain - report

By Paul Casciato LONDON (Reuters) - More than half of British consumers refuse to spend money unless it is "absolutely necessary" in a weak economy, with prosecco now more likely to mark a special occasion than champagne, according a new consumer trend report released on Friday. Global research firm Mintel's annual "British Lifestyles" report said one day after the country skirted a "triple dip" recession that consumers have made paying their bills and saving for a rainy day their top priorities.

Nigeria's elite make country toast of champagne sellers

The party was just getting started at a plush club in this teeming Nigerian city, hip-hop blaring, the bar bathed in blue light -- and champagne bottles on ice already adorning tables. "Too much oil money," said a 40-year-old man at Rhapsody's in the high-end Victoria Island district of Lagos, when asked about Nigerian spending on champagne. Two bottles of Laurent-Perrier chilled in ice buckets on the table in front of him. His company was picking up the tab, like others here, he said, declining to give his name or say what he did for a living.

Sign of the times as Cristal gets swapped for Cava

Times are tough but everyone still needs a little sparkle in their lives. That's the message from the bubbles industry's latest figures, which indicate champagne sales are going flat while more affordable upstarts like prosecco continue to fizz thanks to a trend towards everyday indulgence. For rap stars and Premier League footballers, it still has to be Cristal. But for many ordinary consumers, even in France, cava will do just as well to get the party started.

Champagne sales lose fizz in 2012

Sales of champagne fell by 4.4 percent in volume terms last year, but increased exports helped compensate for sagging European consumption and kept revenue flat at 4.37 billion euros ($5.86 billion), a trade association said Tuesday. The slide in annual sales to 308.8 million bottles in 2012 was primarily due to the sharp 13.3 percent fall in European sales and a 8.8 percent fall in France in December, the Champagne Wine Professionals Committee (CIVC) said Tuesday.
Syndicate content