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Hunt is on for new emerging tigers: MINT, PPICS and CIVETS

For more than 10 years the rise of big emerging markets has re-shaped the global economy but these are now slowing with maturity, and the hunt is on to identify which upstarts will be tomorrow's tigers. The big five, which recently helped the world through financial crisis but are now experiencing marked growing pains, are Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa, the BRICS. On their heels come the MINT, PPICS and CIVETS: acronyms created by economists and investors to describe groups of countries of similar type which could lead the next wave of emerging energy.

Jim O'Neill: BRICs, MINTs strong despite emerging market wobbles

By Tim Cocks LAGOS (Reuters) - The large, fast-growing emerging market countries dubbed the BRICs and MINTs are still likely to be the most promising investment destinations over the next decade, despite emerging market turbulence, Jim O'Neill, who coined the terms, said. Former Goldman Sachs economist O'Neill came up with the name BRIC in 2001 to group Brazil, Russia, India and China as countries whose growth will shape the world economy in the coming decades.

Russia and the dead BRIC thesis: James Saft

By James Saft (Reuters) - Sometimes it takes a slap in the face to make you realize a long-cherished belief is long dead. Russia's power move in Ukraine is the slap and the so-called BRICs (Brazil, Russia, India and China) as an investment concept is the (now very much dead) belief.

China treats South Africa as business equals

China does business with South Africa on an equal footing, unlike Western former colonial powers who still act like its master, President Jacob Zuma has said. "The countries that have been dealing with us before, particularly old economies, they've dealt with us as former subjects, as former colonial subjects," he said. "The Chinese don't deal with us from that point of view. They deal with us as people that you must do business (with), at an equal level so to speak," Zuma told CNBC Africa in an interview broadcast Thursday.

G20 final document to address U.S. policy impact on emerging markets

By Lidia Kelly MOSCOW (Reuters) - The world's financial leaders will address the impact of U.S. monetary policy on emerging markets in a final document from their meeting this week in Sydney, but the wording has yet to be agreed, a Russian G20 official said. Finance ministers and central bank governors from the Group of 20 major developing and advanced economies, which acts as a steering committee for global economic policy, will meet on February 22-23.

In worsening dispute, India orders club closure, U.S. delays trip

By Frank Jack Daniel and David Brunnstrom NEW DELHI/WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. energy secretary on Wednesday postponed a visit to India, while New Delhi ordered the U.S. Embassy to close a club for expatriate Americans, as a worsening diplomatic dispute exposed fault lines between the world's two most populous democracies.

India, US try to smooth over arrested diplomat row

India and the United States tried Thursday to soothe a blistering row over the arrest and strip-search of a female diplomat in New York, saying it should not do lasting damage to ties. After US Secretary of State John Kerry expressed "regret" at the episode in a fence-mending phone call, India's Foreign Minister Salman Khurshid hoped the "valuable relationship" would be back on an even keel shortly.

We're still friends, says India minister after row with US

India wants to ensure the furore over the arrest and strip-search of a female diplomat in New York does not do lasting harm to its "valuable relationship" with the US, its foreign minister said Thursday. "I can't believe that either side wants to put at risk a very valuable relationship in which we have made an enormous investment," Salman Khurshid told India's CNN-IBN network. "Things happen between friends, even things that are terrible. "The whole thing about friendship is that it survives, survives the test of this nature."

US 'regrets' diplomat treatment as India seethes

The United States voiced regret to India over the treatment of a diplomat whose account of being stripped and cavity-searched triggered outrage as the prosecutor in charge of the case defended the arrest. With New Delhi vowing to "restore the dignity" of diplomat Devyani Khobragade, Indian media reported that the 39-year-old was being moved from her post as deputy consul general in New York to the UN mission in a bid to thwart her prosecution.

US 'regrets' diplomat treatment as India seethes

The United States voiced regret to India on Wednesday over the treatment of a diplomat whose account of being stripped and cavity-searched triggered outrage. With New Delhi vowing to "restore the dignity" of diplomat Devyani Khobragade, Indian media reported that the 39-year-old was being moved from her post as deputy consul general in New York to the UN mission in a bid to thwart her prosecution.
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