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Theorizers of "God particle" win Nobel Prize in physics

Copenhagen, Oct 8 (EFE).- Belgium's François Englert and Briton Peter Higgs will share the 2013 Nobel Prize in physics for their theory of the mechanism that allows matter to have mass, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said Tuesday. Working independently, Higgs and Englert - along with the late Robert Brout - formulated in 1964 the existence of a subatomic particle that came to be known as the Higgs boson or the "God particle."

'God particle' scientists win Nobel Physics Prize

Peter Higgs of Britain and Francois Englert of Belgium won the Nobel Prize for Physics on Tuesday for conceiving of the tantalising "God particle" which confers mass. Higgs, 84, and Englert, 80, were honoured for theorising a particle -- discovered last year after an agonising quest -- that explains why the Universe has substance. "This particle originates from an invisible field that fills up all space. Even when the Universe seems empty this field is there," the jury said in a statement.

Mass appeal: Boson goes hip

The Higgs boson has not only pushed back the frontiers of science -- it has also broken new ground in hipness, spawning songs, merchandising and jokes. Youtube lists nearly two dozen songs devoted to the elusive mass-giving particle, the search for which climaxed last year and earned two physicists the Nobel Prize on Tuesday. The offerings -- mainly from amateurs -- take on the unusual challenge of trying to make particle physics understandable and sexy.

CERN's scientists bask in joy of 'God Particle' Nobel

Scientists at the lab which discovered the "God particle" popped champagne Tuesday, ecstatic over the Nobel Physics Prize award for its theoreticians Peter Higgs and Francois Englert. Scores of staff at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) massed to watch the announcement by the Nobel jury on a live-feed, erupting into applause as the two physicists' names were read out in Stockholm. "It's a great day for particle physics. It's a huge achievement," said Rolf Heuer, head of the lab which straddles the French and Swiss borders on the outskirts of Geneva.

Belgian Nobel laureate Englert lauds late colleague Brout

Belgian scientist Francois Englert said his happiness Tuesday at winning the Nobel Prize for Physics was tempered with regret that life-long colleague Robert Brout could not enjoy the plaudits too. "Of course I am happy to have won the prize, that goes without saying, but there is regret too that my colleague and friend, Robert Brout, is not there to share it," Englert told a press conference at the Free University of Brussels (ULB). Robert Brout died in 2011, having begun the search for the elusive Higgs Boson -- the "God particle" -- with Englert in the 1960s at the ULB.

From ancient Greece to Nobel prize: a Higgs timeline

A timeline of particle physics up to Tuesday's Nobel nod for the theorists behind the Higgs boson. 5th century BC: Greek philosopher Democritus suggests the Universe consists of empty space as well as invisible and indivisible particles called atoms. 1802: John Dalton, a Quaker-educated English physicist and chemist, lays the groundwork for modern atomic theory.

'God particle' scientists win Nobel Physics Prize

Peter Higgs of Britain and Francois Englert of Belgium won the Nobel Prize for Physics on Tuesday for conceiving of the so-called "God particle" which confers mass. Higgs, 84, and Englert, 80, were honoured for theorising a particle -- discovered last year after an agonising quest -- that explains why the Universe has any substance at all. "This particle originates from an invisible field that fills up all space. Even when the Universe seems empty this field is there," the jury said in a statement.

Higgs and Englert win Nobel for work on the Higgs Boson particle

British scientist Peter Higgs said he was "overwhelmed" after he and his Belgian colleague Francois Englert were jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics on Tuesday for their work on the Higgs Boson particle. "I am overwhelmed to receive this award and thank the Royal Swedish Academy," Higgs, 84, said in a statement released by Edinburgh University, where he is emeritus professor of theoretical physics.

Factfile on Higgs boson

Here is a factfile on the Higgs boson, which unlocked the 2013 Nobel Prize on Tuesday for physicists Peter Higgs of Britain and Francois Englert of Belgium: WHAT IS IT? The Higgs boson is a sub-atomic particle that confers mass on matter. Without it, the Universe would have no substance and life would not exist. It was theorised 48 years ago to explain a nagging scientific anomaly -- why some particles have mass and others, like photons (light particles), have none.

Nobel physics laureate Higgs 'overwhelmed'

British scientist Peter Higgs said he was "overwhelmed" after he and his Belgian colleague Francois Englert were jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics on Tuesday for their work on the Higgs Boson particle. "I am overwhelmed to receive this award and thank the Royal Swedish Academy," Higgs, 84, said in a statement released by Edinburgh University, where he is emeritus professor of theoretical physics. "I would also like to congratulate all those who have contributed to the discovery of this new particle and to thank my family, friends and colleagues for their support.
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