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Zimbabwe opposition tries to allay split fears amid squabbling

Zimbabwe's opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai sought Thursday to allay fears of an implosion of his party which has posed the most formidable challenge to veteran ruler Robert Mugabe's hold on power. The Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) of the ex-premier has recently been embroiled in quarrels which have at times degenerated into physical attacks. The bickering got worse after the party's deputy treasurer Elton Mangoma wrote to Tsvangirai suggesting he step down after the MDC's loss to Mugabe's ZANU-PF in elections last July.

Zimbabwe opposition suspends official who urged leader to quit

Zimbabwe's main opposition party on Friday suspended a top official after he publicly called on party leader and former premier Morgan Tsvangirai to resign over his defeat at the polls last year. Elton Mangoma, a former energy minister and deputy treasurer of the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC), was suspended pending an appearance before a disciplinary tribunal.

Zimbabwe opposition official beaten after asking leader to resign

A senior official of Zimbabwe's opposition Movement for Democratic Change who has urged its leader Morgan Tsvangirai to step down, said he was beaten up by party youths on Saturday. The party's deputy treasurer Elton Mangoma told AFP he was assaulted and slightly wounded after a meeting at the party's headquarters in central Harare and in the presence of Tsvangirai. "I was coming out of the meeting when I was attacked," he said in a telephone interview. "The youths at the gate beat me with clenched fists and booted feet."

Tsvangirai urged to quit as Zimbabwe opposition leader

By Cris Chinaka HARARE (Reuters) - Pressure on Zimbabwe opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai to quit rose on Friday as senior members of his party debated whether to call an early congress to decide on his future after losing three presidential elections. Tsvangirai, 61, has led the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) since it was formed in 1999 to challenge President Robert Mugabe - the sole ruler since the former Rhodesia gained independence from Britain in 1980 - and his ZANU-PF party.

Tsvangirai urged to quit as Zimbabwe opposition leader

By Cris Chinaka HARARE (Reuters) - Zimbabwe's main opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai faced more pressure to quit when party chiefs debated on Friday whether to call an early party congress to decide the future of a man who has lost three presidential polls. Tsvangirai, 61, has led the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) since it was formed in 1999 to challenge President Robert Mugabe, the sole ruler since the former Rhodesia gained independence from Britain in 1980, and his ZANU-PF party.

Zimbabwe's opposition leader Tsvangirai urged to resign

A senior member of Zimbabwe's opposition Movement for Democratic Change has urged party leader Morgan Tsvangirai to step down, months after a crushing electoral defeat to President Robert Mugabe. "It is my humble submission that, at this juncture, it is time you consider leaving the office of the president of the movement," Elton Mangoma, MDC's deputy treasurer general wrote in a letter to Tsvangirai last week. "The party is in dire need for new ideas, new thinking, a new trajectory and new stimulus."

Tsvangirai vows to lead Zimbabwe opposition until 2016

Zimbabwean opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai batted away calls for him to resign Wednesday and announced a shadow cabinet, vowing to keep veteran President Robert Mugabe's regime in check. Tsvangirai scoffed at "irresponsible" calls for him to step down after failing to beat Mugabe for the third time in July elections that were overshadowed by rigging allegations. "It's a betrayal of the people's aspirations. I was elected by the party congress and the next congress will be in 2016."

Zimbabwe's opposition implicitly rejects talks with Mugabe

Zimbabwe's defeated opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai claimed on Wednesday that veteran President Robert Mugabe had attempted to talk to him after last month's disputed elections. Tsvangirai, who has dismissed the July 31 election as a "farce" after it extended Mugabe's 33-year rule by another five years, appeared to reject any such talks. "After stealing the vote, they don't even know where to start," he said, referring to Mugabe's ZANU-PF party.

Zimbabwe's opposition implicitly rejects talks with Mugabe

Zimbabwe's defeated opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai claimed on Wednesday that veteran President Robert Mugabe had attempted to talk to him after last month's disputed elections. Tsvangirai, who has dismissed the July 31 election as a "farce" after it extended Mugabe's 33-year rule by another five years, appeared to reject any such talks. "After stealing the vote, they don't even know where to start." "They are now asking 'where is Tsvangirai, so that we can talk?' Talk about what?" he said at the burial of a party activist who died last week.

Mugabe tells defeated foe to 'go hang'

A defiant Robert Mugabe on Monday told those upset by his disputed landslide election win to "go hang," vowing his victory would never be overturned. The 89-year-old vowed never to let go of his victory, after his opponent Morgan Tsvangirai lodged a petition in court challenging the election outcome. "Those who were hurt by defeat can go hang if they so wish," Mugabe told thousands at a rally to honour heroes of the country's liberation wars. "If they die, even dogs will not sniff at their corpses," he said in a punchy first public address after the July 31 vote.
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