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Australia's dingo is a unique species, study shows

By Pauline Askin SYDNEY (Reuters) - Australia's dingo is a unique species, not a kind of wild dog as previously believed, according to a new study that definitively classifies the country's largest land predator. The research by Australian scientists, published in the Journal of Zoology, resurrected the species name "Canis dingo", first adopted in 1793 by Friedrich Meyer, a German naturalist.

Fears for dingoes as Australia's wild dog faces extinction

Marle and Digger may be small and cute puppies, but make no mistake, warns their handler Matt Williams: these 18-week-old dingoes are wild animals that would never make suitable pets. The brother and sister pair who live at the Alice Springs Desert Park in central Australia are genetically pure dingoes, meaning they are two of the increasingly rare specimens of the aggressive sub-species of the Grey Wolf. "They are very, very different to a domestic dog," Williams says as he attempts to keep the agile animals under control.

UK foils Australian bid to buy kangaroo, dingo paintings

Two paintings thought to be the first depiction of a kangaroo and a dingo in Western art will remain in Britain after a national fundraising campaign to stop them being sold to an Australian gallery, officials said Wednesday. The oils by British animal painter George Stubbs were first exhibited in London in 1773, giving the public their first glimpse of the exotic creatures most identified with the wild new territory of Australia.

The toad that turned into a nice little earner

Once upon a time a poisonous cane toad lived in the South Sea Islands, unloved and unwanted. Condemned as an ecological disaster, the Australian army was even deployed to get rid of it. Then one day a Polish fairy waved her wand and the plain old cane toad turned into a precious fashion accessory. That's the story of Polish designer Monika Jarosz's luxury Kobja brand inspired by the fairytale idea of the "toad that transforms itself into Prince Charming".

Cane toads wiping out crocodiles Down Under

Australia's noxious cane toad is wiping out populations of a unique miniature crocodile, researchers warned Wednesday, with fears the warty, toxic creature could extinguish the rare reptile. A team from Charles Darwin University studying the impacts of the foul toad in upstream escarpments found "significant declines" in numbers of dwarf freshwater crocodiles after the amphibians' arrival. Dwarf crocodiles are thought to be stunted due to a lack of available food and researchers believe the crocs started gobbling up the cane toads when they came along.

Reuters Odd News Summary

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Reuters Odd News Summary

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Reuters Odd News Summary

Following is a summary of current odd news briefs. One-man bank keeps German village business running GAMMESFELD, Germany (Reuters) - Peter Breiter, 41, is an unusual banker. Not for him the big bonuses, complicated financial instruments and multi-million deals. He is happy instead writing transaction slips out by hand for the 500 inhabitants of the tiny southern German village of Gammesfeld. Captain Cook's pistol fetches $227,000 at auction

Reuters Odd News Summary

Following is a summary of current odd news briefs. One-man bank keeps German village business running GAMMESFELD, Germany (Reuters) - Peter Breiter, 41, is an unusual banker. Not for him the big bonuses, complicated financial instruments and multi-million deals. He is happy instead writing transaction slips out by hand for the 500 inhabitants of the tiny southern German village of Gammesfeld. Emu heist baffles Australian wildlife park
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