Connect to share and comment

Lebanon parliament to meet April 23 for presidential vote

Lebanon's parliament is to convene on April 23 to elect a new president to succeed Michel Sleiman, whose term ends on May 25, the National News Agency reported Wednesday. "Parliamentary speaker Nabih Berri has called for a session on Wednesday April 23 to elect a new president of the republic," the official news agency said. Lebanon's president, who must come from the country's Maronite Christian community, is elected by a vote in the parliament. Michel Moussa, a member of Berri's parliamentary bloc, said he hoped there would be a quorum for the session.

Lebanon parliament to meet April 23 for presidential vote

Lebanon's parliament is to convene on April 23 to elect a new president to succeed Michel Sleiman, whose term ends on May 25, the National News Agency reported Wednesday. "Parliamentary speaker Nabih Berri has called for a session on Wednesday April 23 to elect a new president of the republic," the official news agency said. Lebanon's president, who must come from the country's Maronite Christian community, is elected by a vote in the parliament. Michel Moussa, a member of Berri's parliamentary bloc, said he hoped there would be a quorum for the session.

Patriotic young Lebanese say the battle to stay is lost

By Oliver Holmes BEIRUT (Reuters) - In both war and peace, Lebanon has always seen many of its ambitious youth leave for better opportunities. More Lebanese live outside Lebanon than in it. But neighboring Syria's civil war, bombs in Lebanon and an economic slowdown have eroded confidence in the country's future and now even loyal patriots are scrambling to get out.

Patriotic young Lebanese say the battle to stay is lost

By Oliver Holmes BEIRUT (Reuters) - In both war and peace, Lebanon has always seen many of its ambitious youth leave for better opportunities. More Lebanese live outside Lebanon than in it. But neighboring Syria's civil war, bombs in Lebanon and an economic slowdown have eroded confidence in the country's future and now even loyal patriots are scrambling to get out.

Lebanon calls for support for army to counter Syria fallout

KUWAIT (Reuters) - Lebanon's foreign minister called on Arab countries on Monday to support the Lebanese army to counter fallout from Syria's civil war, which he said threatened to tear the country apart. Around 1 million Syrian refugees have fled to Lebanon, a displacement that has strained public infrastructure and threatened to upset the sectarian balance. This "is threatening the existence of Lebanon", Gebran Bassil told reporters before a meeting of Arab League leaders in Kuwait on Tuesday.

Lebanon's political system, rooted in agreement that ended civil war, sinks nation into debt

BEIRUT - Lebanese politicians are looking for tens of millions of dollars in aid at a Paris conference on Wednesday with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and world diplomats to help their country cope with a flood of refugees from neighbouring Syria's civil war. But while authorities plead for cash, Lebanon's house is hardly in order.

Hariri murder trial adjourned to add new suspect

The UN-backed tribunal set up to try the killers of former Lebanese premier Rafiq Hariri has postponed the trial at least until May so a fifth suspect can be added, it said Wednesday. Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL) judges ordered earlier this month that Hassan Habib Merhi, 48, was to join the repeatedly delayed trial in absentia of four other Hezbollah members for the 2005 attack that killed Hariri and 22 others, including the suicide bomber.

Lebanon gets new government after 10-month deadlock

Lebanese Prime Minister Tammam Salam on Saturday unveiled a compromise government, capping 10 months of political wrangling during which the war in neighbouring Syria exacerbated sectarian tensions. The 24-member government, including only one woman, brings together the powerful Shiite movement Hezbollah and its allies with the Sunni-led bloc of former prime minister Saad Hariri, who back opposing sides in the Syria war.

Lebanon gets new government after 10-month deadlock

Lebanese Prime Minister Tammam Salam on Saturday unveiled a compromise government, capping 10 months of political wrangling during which the war in neighbouring Syria exacerbated sectarian tensions. The 24-member government, including only one woman, brings together the powerful Shiite movement Hezbollah and its allies with the Sunni-led bloc of former prime minister Saad Hariri, who back opposing sides in the Syria war.

Lebanon's Hariri vows to confront Sunni radicals

By Tom Perry and Laila Bassam BEIRUT (Reuters) - Leading Lebanese politician Saad al-Hariri vowed on Friday to tackle sectarian radicalism in his Sunni sect but said Shi'ite Hezbollah must end its involvement in Syria if Lebanon is to avoid being drawn into a "sectarian holocaust". Citing the example set by his father Rafik al-Hariri on the ninth anniversary of his assassination, Hariri said moderation must win out as Lebanon faces violence fuelled by the Syria war and a political impasse that has left it without a government.
Syndicate content