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Syria most dangerous country for journalists

Syria is the world's most dangerous country for journalists a US-based watchdog said Wednesday as it published its annual impunity index tracking unsolved killings of reporters. The New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists reported a "rising number of targeted killings" of reporters in Syria as a recent threat to journalists operating in the war-torn country. "With unprecedented numbers of abductions and high rates of fatalities in combat and crossfire, Syria was already the world's most dangerous country for journalists," CPJ said.

Online press freedom eroding

US mass surveillance, restrictive legislation and a wave of global cyberattacks drastically restricted online press freedom during 2013, a New York-based media watchdog warned Thursday. The Committee to Protect Journalists has for the first time included cyberspace on its list of countries because of what it called "the profound erosion of freedom in the Internet".

Online press freedom eroding

US mass surveillance, restrictive legislation and a wave of global cyberattacks drastically restricted online press freedom during 2013, a New York-based media watchdog warned Thursday. The Committee to Protect Journalists has for the first time included cyberspace on its list of countries because of what it called "the profound erosion of freedom in the Internet".

Journalist deaths rise to 70 in 2013

The number of journalists killed worldwide this year has risen to 70, including eight who lost their lives in the unusually deadly month of December, a US-based watchdog said Monday. The New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) updated its toll less than two weeks after reporting that 52 journalists had died on the job. Syria was the deadliest assignment, resulting in 28 deaths this year, CPJ said. Ten journalists were killed in Iraq, including five in December alone.

Committee to Protect Journalists says 70 reporters were slain in 2013, including 29 in Syria

NEW YORK, N.Y. - At least 70 journalists were killed on the job around the world in 2013, including 29 who died covering the civil war in Syria and 10 slain in Iraq, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists. The dead in Syria included a number of citizen journalists working to document combat in their home cities, broadcasters who worked with media outlets affiliated with either the government or the opposition, and a handful of correspondents for the foreign press, including an Al-Jazeera reporter, Mohamed al-Mesalma, who was shot by a sniper.

Missing reporter is safe in central Mexico

Mexico City, Dec 24 (EFE).- Zoila Edith Marquez Chiu, a journalist missing since Dec. 7 in the central Mexican state of Zacatecas, is back home and in good condition, officials said Tuesday. "The parents of the journalist were the ones who informed authorities that their daughter is at home, unharmed and in good health," Zacatecas Attorney General Arturo Nahle Garcia said in a statement. Prosecutors will wait until they have spoken with Marquez before deciding what course of action to take, the AG said.

2013 was the second worst year for journalists in jail

The number of journalists killed and imprisoned fell in 2013 but it was still the second worst year on record for reporters in prison, a US-based watchdog said Wednesday. So far this year, 52 journalists have been killed as a direct result of their work, down from 73 last year, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ), based in New York. For the second consecutive year, Turkey was the world's leading jailer of journalists, followed closely by Iran and China.

Fears over self-censorship as pressure mounts on Turkish media

Prominent Turkish journalist Can Dundar says he misses the media censorship that followed a bloody 1980 military coup -- at least then, journalists knew where they stood. The 52-year-old, who was ousted this summer from the liberal paper where he had worked since 2001, believes that a new, more insidious form of censorship is silencing dissent at a crucial time for Turkey.

Reporters in conflict zones appeal for justice at UN

Journalists seized a rare chance Wednesday to plead for greater UN Security Council protection as the world media death toll mounts amid increased coverage of Syria and other conflicts. AFP's prize-winning Somalia correspondent Mustafa Haji Abdinur told the 15 council ambassadors he was a "dead man walking" because of the dangers he faces covering his own country. Abdinur was one of four reporters to address the Security Council on Wednesday as the bullet-ridden body of crime reporter Alberto Lopez Bello was found in the Mexican city of Oaxaca.

Nigeria, Brazil cited on journalist violence list

The Committee to Protect Journalists highlighted Nigeria and Brazil on Tuesday as among the worst offenders for violence against reporters -- and failure to bring culprits to justice. The New York-based media rights group issued its annual Impunity Index headed once again by Iraq, which has been a particularly deadly place for journalists since the US invasion in 2003, even if murders are currently in decline. There are "more than 90 unsolved journalist murders over the past decade and no sign that authorities are working to solve any of them," the CPJ said.
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