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T. rex skeleton arrives at Smithsonian

Washington, Apr 16 (EFE).- One of the most complete Tyrannosaurus rex skeletons ever recovered has arrived at its new home in this capital: the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History. The Smithsonian on Tuesday presented its plans for that museum's new dinosaur and fossil hall, which will open in 2019 and have the nearly complete T. rex skeleton as its centerpiece.

T. rex skeleton arrives at Smithsonian

Washington, Apr 16 (EFE).- One of the most complete Tyrannosaurus rex skeletons ever recovered has arrived at its new home in this capital: the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History. The Smithsonian on Tuesday presented its plans for that museum's new dinosaur and fossil hall, which will open in 2019 and have the nearly complete T. rex skeleton as its centerpiece.

Pint-sized tyrannosaur was king of the Arctic

A pint-sized tyrannosaur braved the frigid Arctic and feasted on fellow dinosaurs 70 million years ago, according to a report Wednesday on a new species identified from fossilized skull bones in Alaska. Scientists have crowned the fierce creature the "polar bear lizard," or Nanuqsaurus hoglundi, and they say it stood as tall as a modern man but was half the size of its very close cousin, T. rex, the "lizard king."

Meet the dino which terrorised tyrannosaurs

Palaeontologists on Friday announced they had uncovered the remains of one of the greatest land predators ever -- a nine-metre (30-foot) four-tonne dinosaur that stalked the planet 100 million years ago. The newly-discovered species has been called Siats meekerorum, whose first name honours a cannibalistic monster in the mythology of the Native American Ute people. A giant meat-eater, the dino lorded it even over the tyrannosaurs of the time, the scientists said.

G'day dino: Replica of Saskatchewan T. Rex on display in Australian museum

REGINA - Scotty the Saskatchewan T. Rex is about to have a new audience in Australia. A full-sized replica of the dinosaur uncovered in the Frenchman River Valley near Eastend is being shown at the Australian Museum in Sydney. The skeleton is an exact copy of the one made for the Royal Saskatchewan Museum. That replica was unveiled last March at the T. Rex Discovery Centre in Eastend. The Australian exhibit showcases 10 life-sized dinosaur specimens that include a newly discovered feathery relative of T. Rex found in China.

Dueling dinosaur fossils fail to sell at New York auction

By Curtis Skinner NEW YORK (Reuters) - Fossils of two dinosaurs locked in a death match failed to sell at auction on Tuesday despite predictions they would fetch a record $9 million. The top bid for the dinosaur fossils was $5.5 million and did not meet the reserve price, Bonhams auction house said. Pre-sale estimates had been $7 million to $9 million.

Dueling dinosaur bones could set fossil auction record

By Curtis Skinner NEW YORK (Reuters) - Fossils of two dinosaurs found in Montana and locked eternally in a fierce death match could fetch a potential record $9 million when they are sold in New York next week, the Bonhams auction house said on Thursday. The Montana Dueling Dinosaurs & Distinguished Fossils sale on Tuesday will feature 70 lots, including the two dinosaurs thought to have killed each other in fierce combat and then quickly been buried on top of each other.

Scientists say new dinosaur found in Utah is relative of T. rex

By Laila Kearney (Reuters) - Scientists in Utah say they have discovered Tyrannosaurus rex's "great-uncle," a massive predator with a thick skull and large teeth dubbed the "king of gore." Bones of the 24-foot (7.3-meter) -long dinosaur, slightly smaller than T. rex and older by about 10 million years, were unveiled at the Natural History Museum of Utah in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, and an announcement of the species discovery was published in the scientific journal Plos One.

'King of gore' dino is T. rex's oldest known cousin

A new species of tyrannosaur has been unearthed in Utah, with skull bones showing an 80 million-year-old beast that is the oldest known cousin of the legendary T. rex. The meat-eating Lythronax argestes, which means "king of gore," had wide-set eyes that helped it track prey and a load of teeth packed into a more slender snout than the T. rex's, researchers said in the journal PLoS ONE. The Lythronax was among the lighter, more compactly built tyrannosaurids, and may have been about half as heavy as the largest T. rex.

Most complete dinosaur skeleton ever found in B.C. could be sign of more to come

TUMBLER RIDGE, B.C. - It took five years of painstaking work on a remote B.C. hillside near the Alberta border, but last week, paleontologist Richard McCrea and his team finally unearthed the most complete dinosaur skeleton ever found in B.C. "It's been time consuming, but it's quite something to go from discovering a dinosaur and excavating it and removing it," McCrea said in an interview Thursday, describing the skeletal remains of the approximately 73-million-year-old hadrosaur that was airlifted to the Tumbler Ridge Museum last week.
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