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S.Africa to pull out troops from C.Africa after coup

South Africa has decided to pull its troops out of the Central African Republic because the deal under which they were deployed has become void with the fall the government there, President Jacob Zuma said Thursday. "We have taken a decision to withdraw our soldiers," Zuma was quoted as saying by the public broadcaster SABC, at the end of a summit of African regional leaders. Zuma who had faced questions over the presence of his troops following the gunning down by rebels of 13 South African paratroopers during the bloody battle for the capital, Bangui.

Leaders weigh C.Africa crisis as Chad implicated in coup

Central Africa's post-coup crisis will come under the spotlight at a regional summit in Chad on Wednesday, as ousted leader Francois Bozize accuses his former Chadian allies of backing the rebels who unseated him. South African President Jacob Zuma will attend the extraordinary summit as he faces prickly questions over the presence of his troops in the country, 13 of whom were killed in the bloody battle for Bangui.

S.African troops alarmed over killing child soldiers in C. Africa

South African soldiers who survived last week's rebel takeover of the Central African Republic are traumatised after discovering later that some of the rebels killed were child soldiers, local Sunday newspapers reported. In what has turned out to be South Africa's heaviest military loss since apartheid, 13 soldiers were killed last weekend in Bangui in clashes with Seleka rebels who toppled president Francois Bozize. Around 200 South African troops fought against some 3,000 rebels during the battle for the Central African capital that lasted several hours.

Fears of food shortages after C.Africa after coup

New rebel authorities in the Central African Republic struggled to restore order in the coup-hit capital on Thursday as the UN warned tens of thousands of people faced going hungry after days of looting. Drinking water and electrical power were still cut off in parts of Bangui after Michel Djotodia and his Seleka coalition seized the city on Sunday, forcing president Francois Bozize to flee.

Chad rebels say to resume fight, Deby's promises unmet

By John Irish PARIS (Reuters) - Chadian rebels said on Thursday they would take up arms again against President Idriss Deby after he failed to negotiate with them since they agreed to stop fighting more than two years ago. The Union of Forces of Resistance (UFR), a rebel coalition, put down their weapons after Chad and Sudan agreed to end their proxy wars in 2010 by ceasing their support for insurgents in each other's country.

Chad rebel group UFR to resume fighting: leader

The main rebel coalition in Chad, the Union of Resistance Forces (UFR), said Thursday it was resuming its fight against President Idriss Deby Itno's regime. "We have decided to resume the struggle. An armed struggle, of course," Timan Erdimi, a key leader of the group, told AFP from Qatar, where he is in exile. The UFR had laid down its weapons after a 2009 peace deal between Chad and Sudan, which normalised relations after years of accusations that each country was supporting rebels in the other. But Erdimi said his group had been excluded from the peace negotiations.

Chad rebel group UFR to resume fighting: leader

The main rebel coalition in Chad, the Union of Resistance Forces (UFR), said Thursday it was resuming its fight against President Idriss Deby Itno's regime. "We have decided to resume the struggle. An armed struggle, of course," Timan Erdimi, a key leader of the group, told AFP from Qatar, where he is in exile. The UFR had laid down its weapons after a 2009 peace deal between Chad and Sudan, which normalised relations after years of accusations that each country was supporting rebels in the other. But Erdimi said his group had been excluded from the peace negotiations.

Chad emerges as regional superpower in Mali conflict

Claiming to have killed two Islamist leaders in the Mali conflict so far, Chad is emerging as a regional superpower whose strong army is brushing up the image of what was once most known as one of the world's poorest nations. "Since a few years, Chad has tried to position itself as a regional power and it does so pretty well," a Western source said.

URGENT ¥¥¥ Chad troops killed Qaeda commander Abou Zeid: president

Chadian troops killed Abdelhamid Abou Zeid, one of the main leaders of Al-Qaeda's north African branch on February 22 during fighting in northern Mali, Chad's President Idriss Deby Itno said late Friday. The Chadian troops confronted the jihadists in the mountains in the Kidal region and "our soldiers killed two jihadist chiefs including Abou Zeid," Deby said. yas-cl/sba/jmm

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CHADIAN PRESIDENT DEBY SAYS CHAD'S TROOPS KILLED AL QAEDA COMMANDER ABOU ZEID IN CLASHES IN NORTHERN MALI
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