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Weibo debut highlights complicated dance with Chinese censors

By Gerry Shih and Yimou Lee SAN FRANCISCO/HONG KONG (Reuters) - Weibo Corp executives on Thursday toasted the Chinese social media firm's debut at Nasdaq's New York headquarters. Hours earlier in Beijing, Charles Xue, a Chinese-American venture capitalist and prominent Weibo user, celebrated a different kind of coming-out: his release after eight months in jail.

Sina Weibo shares jump 19% in US debut

Sina Weibo, China's answer to Twitter, debuted on the Nasdaq exchange Thursday with a 19.1 percent jump despite an IPO that went out undersubscribed and lower priced than hoped. In a spate of buying that suggested that Wall Street's waters are still welcoming to loss-making technology high flyers, and to Chinese firms as well, Weibo shares rose from the subscription price of $17 to as high as $24.28, before settling the day at $20.24.

Sina Weibo shares jump 19% in US debut

Sina Weibo, China's answer to Twitter, debuted on the Nasdaq exchange Thursday with a 19.1 percent jump despite an IPO that went out undersubscribed and lower priced than hoped. In a spate of buying that suggested that Wall Street's waters are still welcoming to loss-making technology high flyers, and to Chinese firms as well, Weibo shares rose from the subscription price of $17 to as high as $24.28, before settling the day at $20.24.

Chinese social media company Weibo's shares jump in US stock market debut

Chinese social media company Weibo Corp.'s shares soared in their U.S. market debut Thursday. Weibo was launched four years ago by Chinese online media company Sina Corp. Weibo provides a Twitter-like service that allows users to post a feed of up to 140 Chinese characters to share with others. Users can also attach multimedia, such as photos and videos, to their posts. The company has 61.4 million average daily active users, according to its filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

Sina Weibo shares jump more than 10% after IPO

Shares of Sina Weibo, China's answer to Twitter, jumped more than 10 percent in initial trade Thursday after an undersubscribed initial public offering. Ten minutes into trade the shares topped $19, compared with the $17 IPO price. Weibo's parent, the Chinese Internet giant Sina Corp, sought to raise as much as $380 million listing the subsidiary on the Nasdaq exchange, but only pulled in $286 million as it ran into a market jittery over both tech and Chinese company shares. But retail buyers jumped on the shares despite a weak market overall. pmh/vs

Sina Weibo shares jump more than 6% after IPO

Shares of Sina Weibo, China's answer to Twitter, began trading sharply higher Thursday after an undersubscribed initial public offering. Minutes into trade the shares were over $18, compared with the $17 IPO price. pmh/vs

'Chinese Twitter' firm Weibo to go public in US

Sina Weibo, widely known as China's version of Twitter, is to go public in the United States Thursday at a price below expectations after a recent sell-off in technology stocks. The microblogging subsidiary of Chinese Internet behemoth Sina was to make its debut on the Nasdaq exchange under the symbol "WB" in an initial public offering (IPO) expected to raise at least $340 million.

Weibo IPO below expectations, raises $285.6 mn

Sina Weibo has sold fewer shares than expected in its US IPO which has been priced below expectations, a report said Thursday, ahead of its listing which takes place after selloffs on Wall Street. The Beijing-based firm, often described as China's version of Twitter, sold 16.8 million US depositary shares at $17, raising $285.6 million before the sale of any additional shares to underwriters, Dow Jones Newswires said, quoting two people familiar with the deal.

Man confesses in first public trial in China's rumor crackdown: Xinhua

BEIJING (Reuters) - A popular internet microblogger confessed in court to spreading rumors about the Chinese government, the official Xinhua news agency reported on Friday, in the first public trial since China began cracking down on online rumors last year. Rights advocates say China's campaign to quash online rumors, which began last summer, is tantamount to crushing free expression. The government says the crackdown is necessary to preserve social stability.

Weibo seeks to raise at least $340 mln in US IPO

The microblogging service Weibo -- often described as China's version of Twitter -- will raise at least $340 million in its US stock offering, an updated filing showed Friday. The updated plan suggests a tighter relationship with Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba as Weibo spins off from the Internet firm Sina, another major player in China. The filing by Weibo scales back the amount indicated last month of up to $500 million.
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