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China circumcision patient held over doctor's murder

A Chinese man "dissatisfied" with his circumcision is suspected of killing a doctor at the hospital where the operation was carried out, state media reported Wednesday. Wang Fangli, who underwent the surgical procedure last week, stabbed Shan Erhui to death in the doctors' lounge of a hospital in Fengxian county in the eastern province of Jiangsu on Tuesday, the official Xinhua news agency said. It was not clear whether Shan was the doctor who performed the operation, or why Wang, 45, had it carried out. Circumcisions are not common in China.

Intuitive Surgical expects revenue below estimates as da Vinci sales fall

By Natalie Grover (Reuters) - Intuitive Surgical Inc <ISRG.O> estimated first-quarter revenue well below analysts' average expectation mainly due to a 60 percent drop in sales of its flagship da Vinci robot system. The company's shares fell nearly 10 percent in extended trading.

Seoul to limit plastic surgery ads

The South Korean capital Seoul is to restrict the use of plastic surgery adverts on public transport, officials said Wednesday, after complaints that they were fuelling an unhealthy obsession with body image. South Korea, and particularly Seoul, has an international reputation for plastic surgery, and adverts featuring famous surgeons and giant before-and-after photos are omnipresent -- on street billboards, subway trains, bus stops and the backs of bus seats.

Police opens probe into patient death after cosmetic surgery

SEOUL, March 11 (Yonhap) -- Police said Tuesday they have launched an investigation into the death of a woman who had cosmetic surgery at a Seoul clinic. The 34-year-old patient, whose name was withheld, fell unconscious after getting liposuction and a nose job at the clinic in Gangnam, an uptown area in southern Seoul, on Thursday, said the officers at the Seongdong Police Station. She died before being transferred to a general hospital, they added.

Colon surgery at busier hospitals may lead to better recovery

By Kathryn Doyle NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - People who have colon surgery at high-volume hospitals are more likely than patients at smaller ones to go straight home for recovery without needing special care, according to a large new study. There are many ways to gauge the success of a surgery. Being able to perform daily activities and get around independently after the procedure is as important as surviving and avoiding complications, senior author Dr. Daniel Anaya told Reuters Health.

Colon surgery at busier hospitals may lead to better recovery

By Kathryn Doyle NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - People who have colon surgery at high-volume hospitals are more likely than patients at smaller ones to go straight home for recovery without needing special care, according to a large new study. There are many ways to gauge the success of a surgery. Being able to perform daily activities and get around independently after the procedure is as important as surviving and avoiding complications, senior author Dr. Daniel Anaya told Reuters Health.

No breast implants, please: Brazil samba school tells recruits

Two months before Rio's famed Carnival gets under way, a samba school said it was looking for dancers "without silicone breast implants" and would offer a free costume in exchange. The school wants to recruit 20 dancers "with beautiful and natural" breasts "whatever the size," the news website G1 reported Friday, citing Paulo Menezes, Carnival producer for the Mocidade Independente de Padre Miguel samba school. In this tropical country where the female body is flaunted, plastic surgery is very common.

Surgeon all-nighters don't lead to complications - study

By Genevra Pittman NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Sleep-deprived surgeons don't make any more mistakes than usual during gallbladder operations, a new study suggests. Whether doctors had been up doing emergency surgery the previous night did not affect a patient's risk of having complications during or after the procedure. Danielle Nash said the findings should be "reassuring" for patients.

Surgeon all-nighters don't lead to complications: study

By Genevra Pittman NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Sleep-deprived surgeons don't make any more mistakes than usual during gallbladder operations, a new study suggests. Whether doctors had been up doing emergency surgery the previous night did not affect a patient's risk of having complications during or after the procedure. Danielle Nash said the findings should be "reassuring" for patients.

Falls tied to post-op complications in older people

By Andrew M. Seaman NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The number of falls older people take before surgery may help predict their health during recovery, says a new study. Researchers found that older people who reported falling during the six months before heart or bowel surgery had more complications than people who reported no falls. "It's one more marker for older adults that lets us see who is going to do poorly after an operation," Dr. Thomas Robinson, the study's lead author, said.
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