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New Irish abortion bill, after PM sent letters in blood

Ireland published a draft new abortion bill on Thursday after Prime Minister Enda Kenny said he had received plastic foetuses and letters written in blood claiming he is a murderer. The parliamentary bill was published ahead of the release later in the day of a long-awaited report into why an Indian-born dentist who was miscarrying died after being refused an abortion in an Irish hospital. The death of Savita Halappanavar, 31, in October ignited calls for the new legislation in Ireland, a predominantly Catholic country.

Irish PM issues full apology to church laundry victims

Irish Prime Minister Enda Kenny issued a full apology Tuesday to the thousands of women who suffered in church-run laundries, two weeks after stopping short of doing so. A report published a fortnight ago investigating the involvement of the Irish state in the Magdalene laundries found that more than a quarter of the 10,000 women sent to the institutions were sent there by the state. Two weeks on, Kenny said in the Dail lower house that the government and parliament had needed that time to study the report properly and reflect on its findings.

Irish PM issues full apology to church laundry victims

Irish Prime Minister Enda Kenny issued a full apology Tuesday to the thousands of women who suffered in church-run laundries, two weeks after stopping short of doing so. A report published a fortnight ago investigating the involvement of the Irish state in the Magdalene laundries found that more than a quarter of the 10,000 women sent to the institutions were sent there by the state. Two weeks on, Kenny said in the Dail lower house that he wanted the government and parliament to have that time to study the report properly and reflect on its findings.

Irish PM issues full apology to church laundry victims

Irish Prime Minister Enda Kenny issued a full apology Tuesday to the thousands of women who suffered in church-run laundries, two weeks after stopping short of doing so. A report published a fortnight ago investigating the involvement of the Irish state in the Magdalene laundries found that more than a quarter of the 10,000 women sent to the institutions were sent there by the state. Two weeks on, Kenny said in the Dail lower house that he wanted the government and parliament to have that time to study the report properly and reflect on its findings.
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