Connect to share and comment

Artificial hearts can be a temporary fix

An artificial heart may help patients survive while awaiting a heart transplant, although the devices remain risky 10 years after they were approved, according to a US study Thursday. Researchers followed 22 patients with end-stage heart failure over the course of two months, to see how they responded to implantation with a Syncardia total artificial heart, the only such device that is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration.

Second artificial heart implant due in 'weeks': French heartmaker

After its first recipient died, French biomedical firm Carmat said on Monday it expected to try again to implant its experimental artificial heart in another patient "in several weeks". Artificial hearts have been in use for many years as a temporary fix for patients with chronic heart problems, but the Carmat product aims to provide a longer-term solution to enable hospitalised patients to return home and lead normal lives.

Heart maker Carmat to wait before next transplant: founder

By John Irish PARIS (Reuters) - French artificial heart maker Carmat will not carry out any more human transplants until it has determined the cause of the death of the first patient fitted with its device, one of the company's co-founders said on Sunday. Carmat's first patient, a 76-year-old man, died on March 2 in Paris, two and a half months after his operation.

Heart maker Carmat to wait before next transplant: founder

By John Irish PARIS (Reuters) - French artificial heart maker Carmat will not carry out any more human transplants until it has determined the cause of the death of the first patient fitted with its device, one of the company's co-founders said on Sunday. Carmat's first patient, a 76-year-old man, died on March 2 in Paris, two and a half months after his operation.

Trial continues after patient death: French heartmaker

French biomedical firm Carmat said Tuesday it would implant its experimental artificial heart into another three people, as planned, after the first recipient died. In an email to AFP, the company said it was too soon to draw conclusions about the device's efficacy. A 76-year-old recipient died over the weekend, 75 days after receiving the gadget, whose trials are being closely followed by French investors. "It is premature to draw conclusions based on the outcomes from a single patient," said the the firm, whose stock was suspended at its own request on Tuesday.

Trial continues after patient death: French heartmaker

French biomedical firm Carmat said Tuesday it would implant its experimental artificial heart into another three people, as planned, after the first recipient died. In an email to AFP, the company said it was too soon to draw conclusions about the device's efficacy. A 76-year-old recipient died over the weekend, 75 days after receiving the gadget, whose trials are being closely followed by French investors. "It is premature to draw conclusions based on the outcomes from a single patient," said the the firm, whose stock was suspended at its own request on Tuesday.

First patient fitted with Carmat artificial heart dies

By Natalie Huet PARIS (Reuters) - The first patient fitted with an artificial heart made by the French company Carmat has died, the hospital that had performed the transplant in December said on Monday. The 76-year-old man died on Sunday, 75 days after the operation, the Georges Pompidou European Hospital in Paris said in a statement, adding that the cause of his death could not be known for sure at this stage.

TV's 'Dr House' helps solve real-life medical mystery

For a year, the patient suffered from a range of worsening symptoms that left doctors stumped. His heart started failing, his sight and hearing deteriorated, he suffered from acid reflux, swollen lymph nodes and an inexplicable fever. The outlook was grim. Only Dr Gregory House, TV's misfit medical genius, could solve the mystery: the cause was an eroded prosthetic hip. But this time the sleuthing did not happen on the small screen but in real life, The Lancet reported on Friday.

TV's 'Dr House' helps solve real-life medical mystery

For a year, the patient suffered from a range of worsening symptoms that left doctors stumped. His heart started failing, his sight and hearing deteriorated, he suffered from acid reflux, swollen lymph nodes and an inexplicable fever. The outlook was grim. Only Dr Gregory House, TV's misfit medical genius, could solve the mystery: the cause was an eroded prosthetic hip. But this time the sleuthing did not happen on the small screen but in real life, The Lancet reported on Friday.

Tennis: Tomic facing months out with hip surgery

Young Australian star Bernard Tomic is likely to be out of tennis for up to three months after scans revealed a long-standing hip injury, a report said Sunday. Tomic tried to delay surgery until after Australia's Davis Cup against France later this month, but was overruled by doctors and will face surgery this month in Melbourne, News Ltd newspapers said. Tomic was jeered by the home crowd after retiring injured after one set of his first-round match with Rafael Nadal at the Australian Open on Tuesday.
Syndicate content