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Wyoming wins state Supreme Court battle against online travel companies over lodging tax

CHEYENNE, Wyo. - The Wyoming Supreme Court has ruled the state can collect the full tax amount on retail lodging sales made by online travel companies, even if they have no physical presence in the state. The ruling comes during a national debate between states and online retailers over whether the online retailers should pay local and state taxes like brick-and-mortar stores.

Colorado made $3.5 million in pot tax in first month

Marijuana sales in Colorado brought in $3.5 million in tax revenues and fees in the first month retail pot outlets were allowed, the western US state said Monday. The figure included $2.9 million in taxes for recreational and medical marijuana in the month of January, and nearly $600,000 in fees, said Colorado's Department of Revenue. The Rocky Mountain state had legalized pot in 2012, but made drug history on January 1 by inaugurating retail sales of marijuana for recreational use. It levies a 15 percent excise tax and a 2.9 percent sales tax.

Manitoba government may have sent 35 tax statements to wrong businesses

WINNIPEG - The Manitoba government says it may have mailed about 35 tax statements to the wrong businesses. The Finance department says the statements were for retail sales tax accounts that were in arrears, and include the business name, account number and amount of tax owing. The department says the statements were mistakenly put in envelopes with statements destined for other businesses. The province has notified all sales tax account holders of the problem as well as the provincial ombudsman.

Spain slashes sales tax on art

Spain's government Friday slashed a tax on sales of works of art as a "first step" to help the cultural industry, which has been howling about the impact of a 21-percent sales tax. Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy's conservative government decided at a ministerial meeting to cut the sales tax for works of art by more than half, to 10 percent.

Mexico lawmakers back tax on junk food, pet treats

Mexico's lower house has approved a disputed fiscal reform plan that includes taxes on sugary drinks, junk food and pet treats to boost government revenue in Latin America's second economy. President Enrique Pena Nieto has pushed the legislation, which would also raise taxes on higher earners, to improve the country's lackluster tax collection, one of the lowest in the region. But soft drink firms and other businesses have criticized the proposed taxes as bad for the economy, taking out advertisements in newspapers to oppose the legislation.

Mexico Lower House OKs revised government tax plan

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Mexico's Lower House of Congress on Thursday gave general approval to a revised government tax plan that aims to boost receipts by nearly 3 percent of GDP by 2018. The bill was revised on Wednesday to raise the top income tax rate on a sliding scale to 35 percent, impose a 5 percent tax on junk food and roll back plans to apply sales tax on rents, mortgages, property sales and school fees.

Mexico Lower House OKs revised government tax plan

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Mexico's Lower House of Congress on Thursday gave general approval to a revised government tax plan that aims to boost receipts by nearly 3 percent of GDP by 2018. The bill was revised on Wednesday to raise the top income tax rate on a sliding scale to 35 percent, impose a 5 percent tax on junk food and roll back plans to apply sales tax on rents, mortgages, property sales and school fees.

27 of 47 governors in Japan support April sales tax hike

Governors in 27 of Japan's 47 prefectures support a planned consumption tax increase to 8 percent from the current 5 percent next April, a Kyodo News survey showed Monday, with many citing the need to cover swelling social security costs. At the same time, many of those favoring an increase said a large-scale stimulus package is necessary to prevent it from hurting Japan's budding economic recovery.

Sales tax hike to be decided at Cabinet meeting Tuesday

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's government is expected to decide at a Cabinet meeting Tuesday to raise the sales tax next April, senior officials of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party said Wednesday. After the Cabinet meeting, scheduled to start at 5 p.m., Abe will hold a press conference at the premier's office to explain the government's decision, which will include approval of a plan to give a tax break to companies and take measures to support low-income individuals and households, they said.

Japanese e-commerce companies want overseas rivals taxed appropriately

Companies including Yahoo Japan Corp., bookstore chain Kinokuniya Co. and online game software developer Dwango Co. urged the Japanese government Wednesday to impose sales tax on e-books and music downloaded from overseas websites to bring them into line with domestic online sales. Under the current tax system, only products from sellers within Japan and imported merchandise are subject to sales tax. E-books and other digital content distributed by online retailers such as Amazon.com Inc. are exempt from sales tax.
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