Connect to share and comment

Five charged in kidnapping of North Carolina prosecutor's father

By Colleen Jenkins WINSTON-SALEM, North Carolina (Reuters) - Five people face kidnapping charges in the abduction of a North Carolina prosecutor's father, who was rescued in Atlanta four days after disappearing from his home, U.S. law enforcement officials said on Thursday. Frank Arthur Janssen, 63, was reported missing on Saturday. His daughter, who was not identified by name in court records, is an assistant district attorney at the Wake County District Attorney's office, they said.

Man convicted in Alberta Mountie deaths to be allowed unescorted absences

BOWDEN, Alta. - A man convicted of manslaughter for his role in the shooting deaths of four Alberta RCMP officers near Mayerthorpe has been granted unescorted, temporary absences from prison. The National Parole Board ruled Wednesday that Shawn Hennessey will be allowed out for up to 72 hours at a time over the next six months. Board spokesman Gary Sears said Hennessey, 34, will have to follow certain restrictions.

Man who killed nine people with bomb at Yellowknife's Giant mine seeks parole

ABBOTSFORD, B.C. - A man serving a life sentence for the deaths of nine people in the 1992 Giant gold mine bombing in Yellowknife is seeking day parole for the first time. Roger Warren was convicted of nine counts of second-degree murder in 1995. He was eligible for day parole in October 2010 and full parole last October, but didn't apply. Warren, who is 70, is serving his sentence at a prison in British Columbia. The Parole Board of Canada's Pacific region office says his day parole hearing will be held this spring, perhaps in June.

Supreme Court rules Conservative retroactive parole law unconstitutional

OTTAWA - The Supreme Court of Canada has ruled that retroactive changes to parole eligibility brought in by the Harper government are unconstitutional. The top court was the third successive court to find that the March 2011 legislation was in clear breach of the Charter of Rights because it imposed new punishment on people who had already been tried and sentenced.

Sydney man convicted of killing Canadian fiancee gets 26 years, no parole for 18

SYDNEY - A Sydney man convicted of murdering his Canadian fiancee in July, 2011 has been sentenced to 26 years in prison, with no parole for 18 years. Simon Gittany, 40, was convicted by a judge in November of killing Lisa Harnum of Ontario in a ''fit of rage'' when he threw her off the 15th-floor balcony of their apartment. Court heard she was planning to leave him. Media reported the sentence, saying the judge ruled it would be excessive to jail Gittany for life would, but that he had no prospects of rehabilitation.

California gets two extra years to reduce prison crowding

SACRAMENTO, California (Reuters) - California won two additional years to reduce overcrowding in its massive prison system under an order issued on Monday by a panel of federal judges, in the latest twist in a decades-long dispute over prison conditions and medical care for inmates.

Australian drug convict to learn Indonesia parole decision

Australian drug trafficker Schapelle Corby is expected to learn Friday whether Indonesian authorities have agreed to grant her parole from a Bali prison. Corby, whose case attracted huge public sympathy in Australia, will find out whether she is to walk free after nine years behind bars when Indonesian Justice Minister Amir Syamsuddin announces his decision in the afternoon.

Australian drug convict to learn Indonesia parole decision

Australian drug trafficker Schapelle Corby is expected to learn Friday whether Indonesian authorities have agreed to grant her parole after more than nine years behind bars on the resort island of Bali. Corby, whose case attracted huge media attention and public sympathy in Australia, is due to find out her fate in the afternoon when Indonesian Justice Minister Amir Syamsuddin announces his decision in Jakarta.

Senior Parole Board official behaved badly, says integrity watchdog

OTTAWA - A Conservative appointee to the Parole Board of Canada shared private details about offenders with the Ontario Provincial Police, says a new report by public sector integrity commissioner Mario Dion. The findings shed light on why former police officer Frederick Tufnell was mysteriously demoted last fall from his position as vice-chairman of the Ontario/Nunavut regional division of the parole board. The Conservative government named Tufnell, a former York region police officer, to the board in 2009 and elevated him to the vice-chairman's job two years later.

Parole Board official behaved badly with women: integrity watchdog

OTTAWA - Public Sector Integrity Commissioner Mario Dion says a senior official at the Parole Board of Canada behaved inappropriately towards female staff, disclosed information to unauthorized persons and put himself in a conflict of interest. Dion says Frederick Tufnell, former vice-chairperson with board's Ontario/Nunavut region, put himself in a conflict when he requested a second review and a new decision on a file he had previously recused himself from for reasons of bias.
Syndicate content