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Lawmaker reveals scale of US mobile data requests

US mobile carriers provided some one million records to law enforcement in 2012 related to warrants, wiretaps, location data and "cell-tower dumps," documents released by a US senator showed. The documents do not detail information handed over to the National Security Agency, which is classified, but the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) said the figures nonetheless highlight concerns over privacy laws for mobile phones.

News Analysis: 4G indicates stronger economic growth for China

BEIJING, Dec. 5 (Xinhua) -- The issuance of fourth-generation (4G) licenses, which marks a new era in China's high-speed mobile network, is expected to boost the country's economic growth along with an increase in information consumption demand. The 4G age will bring about more types of business and services to the country, which has the biggest number of Internet users in the world, the China Securities Journal said on Thursday.

Niger cuts third of mobile connections

Niger has deactivated a third of its mobile phone connections to curb anonymous phone calls used for criminal activity, the country's telecoms regulator has announced. "From today, non-registered SIM cards can no longer be used," said Almoustapha Boubacar, director-general of the regulator on Tuesday. Unattributed phone numbers represented 1.7 million of the west African country's 5.4 million mobile subscribers, Boubacar said at a press conference, appearing alongside bosses from four of Niger's telecoms providers.

Loud US reaction to in-flight phone proposal

The complaints started getting loud almost immediately after US regulators said they were considering allowing cell phone use on airplanes. In petitions, on social media and in press releases, the grumbling began within hours after the Federal Communications Commission said the question would be discussed at a December 12 meeting. The Association of Flight Attendants said it firmly opposed a rule change, citing "the importance of maintaining a calm cabin environment."

U.S. regulators to consider in-flight calls, text messaging

By Alina Selyukh and Karen Jacobs WASHINGTON/ATLANTA (Reuters) - The U.S. Federal Communications Commission is considering allowing airplane passengers to use their cellphones for calls and text messaging during flights, setting up a challenging debate over technical and social implications.

U.S. regulators to consider in-flight calls, text messaging

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Federal Communications Commission on Thursday set plans to expand the use of cell phones aboard airplanes, considering the possibility of allowing in-flight calls and text messaging. Communications regulators on December 12 will vote on a proposal that would allow airlines to offer passengers an option of making phone calls, sending texts or otherwise using their own wireless data and call services.

Israeli restaurant owner offers 50 per cent discount to diners who turn off phones

ABU GHOSH, Israel - A restaurant owner in an Arab village outside of Jerusalem says he is on a mission to save culinary culture by making diners a simple offer: Turn off your cellphone and get a 50 per cent discount. Jawdat Ibrahim says smartphones have destroyed the modern dining experience. He hopes the generous discount will bring back a more innocent time when going to a restaurant was about companionship, conversation and appreciating the food, rather than surfing, texting or talking to the office.

FCC to wireless carriers: agree on phone unlocking policy or face rules

By Alina Selyukh WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The top telecommunications regulator on Thursday demanded that wireless providers voluntarily agree on the rights of consumers to unlock mobile devices once contracts end, or the Federal Communications Commission will make it a rule. At issue is whether cellphone buyers, who often get new devices at a heavily subsidized price in return for committing to long-term contracts, should be able to take their gadgets with them when they change carriers.

Sub-Saharan Africa still fastest growing mobile region

Sub-Saharan Africa is set to remain the world's fastest growing mobile market in the coming years, an industry report said Monday. According to operators body the GSM Association, the region's number of unique subscribers stood at 253 million in June this year and will hit 346 million by 2017. "Despite the astonishing progress of the mobile industry in Sub-Saharan Africa in recent years, the biggest impact of mobile in Africa is yet to come," the report said.

How the AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll on the older workforce was conducted

The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research Poll on the job satisfaction of Americans age 50 and over was conducted from Aug. 8-Sept. 10 by NORC at the University of Chicago. It is based on landline and cellphone interviews with a nationally representative random sample of 1,024 adults 50 years old and older. Interviews included 815 respondents on landline telephones and 209 on cellphones. Digits in the phone numbers dialed were generated randomly to reach households with unlisted and listed landline and cellphone numbers.
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