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Colombian coffee growers end strike after winning subsidy

Striking Colombian coffee growers who have blocked roads for 11 days ended their protest Friday after winning a government subsidy to offset lower prices for their product on international markets. "We are going back to our land to continue producing the best coffee in the world," said Guillermo Gaviria, a protest leader, after the deal was signed with the government. The government concession is a subsidy of up to the equivalent of $80 per 125 kilos (275 pounds) of coffee beans, the Agriculture Ministry said. But it will only be in effect for one year.

Colombia coffee growers protest falling prices

Thousands of Colombian coffee growers staged protests around the country Monday to press for more government support in the face of low coffee prices. President Juan Manuel Santos appealed for dialogue to temper the protest, and urged growers to keep their marches and other actions peaceful and refrain from violence. "The strike being called today is not only inconvenient and unnecessary, it's also unfair," Santos said in a televised speech.

Colombia coffee growers protest falling prices

President Juan Manuel Santos appealed for dialogue Monday to temper a protest strike by Colombian coffee growers angry over losses from falling coffee prices. "The strike being called today is not only inconvenient and unnecessary, it's also unfair," Santos said in a televised speech, urging the growers to keep the protest peaceful and refrain from violence. Since Sunday, thousands of growers from around Colombia have been mobilizing for a march to demand that the government increase subsidies and curb coffee imports.
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