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Australia 'clutching' at MH370 leads after new data

Australia said Monday that French satellite data indicating floating objects possibly linked to missing Flight MH370 related to an area outside the current search zone, while admitting to "clutching" at every piece of new information. Malaysian authorities on Sunday said the data was related to the area of the southern Indian Ocean being scoured for the missing Malaysian jet, which disappeared on March 8 with 239 people on board.

Sightings boost search for missing Malaysia plane

A vast international hunt for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 resumed at dawn in the southern Indian Ocean on Monday, buoyed by a cluster of weekend sightings that have fuelled hopes of a breakthrough. A Chinese military plane set off from Perth at first light to search for "suspicious debris" floating in the remote waters and captured by Chinese and Australian satellite imagery, China's state news agency Xinhua said.

Sightings boost search for missing Malaysia plane

The sighting of a wooden pallet and other debris that may be linked to a Malaysian passenger jet raised hopes Sunday of a breakthrough in the international search for the missing plane. The sense that the hunt was finally on the right track after more than two weeks of false leads and dead ends was reinforced by new French satellite data indicating floating objects in the southern search area.

Sightings boost search for missing Malaysia plane

The sighting of a wooden pallet and other debris that may be linked to a Malaysian passenger jet raised hopes Sunday of a breakthrough in the international search for the missing plane. The sense that the hunt was finally on the right track after more than two weeks of false leads and dead ends was reinforced by new French satellite images showing floating objects in the southern search area.

Debris sighting boosts search for missing Malaysia plane

The first visual sighting of objects that might be linked to Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 boosted search operations Sunday for the missing airliner that mysteriously disappeared more than two weeks ago. Australian officials said a wooden cargo pallet, along with belts or straps, was spotted Saturday in a remote stretch of the southern Indian Ocean that has become the focus of an intense international search in recent days. "It's still too early to be definite," Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott told reporters during a visit to Papua New Guinea.

Missing Malaysia plane search points

Two weeks into the search for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, the fundamental questions of where? how? who? and why? remain unanswered, although some information has been uncovered that points in certain directions. Here are some of the key questions and a look back at what has been learned over the past 14 days.

Sense of desperation as MH370 search enters third week

Australian rescuers stepped up the search for Malaysian Flight MH370 as pressure mounted Saturday to find the missing plane that vanished two weeks ago and has defied the best efforts of modern technology to track it down. Six planes, including four Orion anti-submarine aircraft packed with state-of-the-art surveillance equipment, joined the search for debris from the aircraft over a remote stretch of the Indian Ocean, 2,500 kilometres (1,500 miles) southwest of Perth.

Missing Malaysia plane search points

Two weeks into the search for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, the fundamental questions of where? how? who? and why? remain unanswered, although some information has been uncovered that points in certain directions. Here are some of the key questions and a look back at what has been learned over the past 14 days.

Searchers draw blank in southern search for Malaysia plane

Australian and American planes drew a blank Wednesday on the first full day of a search across a vast tract of the southern Indian Ocean for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. Authorities in Kuala Lumpur on Monday asked Canberra to take responsibility for the "southern vector" of the operation to locate the Boeing 777 that disappeared on March 8 en route to Beijing with 239 passengers and crew on board.

Electronic trail, difficulty of hiding plane would make it hard to steal a big airliner

To steal Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 out of midair would require a pilot who knew how to elude detection by both civilian and military radar. It would take a runway at least a mile long to land the wide-body jet, possibly in the dark, and a hangar big enough to hide it. All without being seen. Improbable but not impossible, experts say. With the search for the missing airliner entering its eighth day, scenarios involving piracy or hijacking are increasingly being talked about as possible explanations for the disappearance of the Boeing 777 with 239 people on board.
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