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Litvinenko widow wins British court battle

The widow of Russian dissident Alexander Litvinenko took a step forward Tuesday in her bid to secure a public inquiry into her husband's death. Home Secretary Theresa May wants to wait for the results of a separate inquest into the 2006 death of Litvinenko, a former agent in Russia's FSB agency, who was poisoned with radioactive polonium-210 while drinking tea at a London hotel. But three judges at England's High Court ruled that May must reconsider her decision after a challenge from his widow, Marina Litvinenko.

UK court quashes decision not to hold Litvinenko poisoning inquiry

By Estelle Shirbon LONDON (Reuters) - The High Court has quashed a decision by the British government not to hold a public inquiry into the murder of former Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko, who died in London in 2006 after being poisoned with a radioactive substance. Tuesday's judgment means the government will have to reconsider the decision, a diplomatically sensitive one as a public inquiry could delve into the issue of whether Russia was involved in the killing. Moscow denies any involvement.

Russia rules out radiation poisoning in Arafat death

Yasser Arafat died of natural causes, not radiation poisoning, Russian scientists who examined his remains said on Thursday, but their findings were dismissed by Swiss experts as politically motivated. The conclusions into the Palestinian leader's 2004 death dovetail with the findings of French investigators but differ from those of Swiss radiation experts who maintain he could have been poisoned. "We have completed all the studies," Vladimir Uiba, head of Russia's Federal Medical-Biological Agency (FMBA), told reporters.

Russia rules out radiation poisoning in Arafat death

Yasser Arafat died of natural causes, not radiation poisoning, Russian scientists who examined his remains said on Thursday, but their findings were dismissed by Swiss experts as politically motivated. The conclusions into the Palestinian leader's 2004 death dovetail with the findings of French investigators but differ from those of Swiss radiation experts who maintain he could have been poisoned. "We have completed all the studies," Vladimir Uiba, head of Russia's Federal Medical-Biological Agency (FMBA), told reporters.

Swiss expert dismisses Russian 'political declaration' on Arafat

The Swiss expert who examined samples of Yasser Arafat's remains dismissed as a "political declaration" a statement Thursday by Russian researchers excluding radiation poisoning as the cause for the Palestinian leader's death. "The Russians, they make claims without providing any data, without providing any scientific arguments, for me that is empty, a political declaration," said Francois Bochud, director of the Lausanne Radiophysics Institute.

Russian experts rule out radiation poisoning in Arafat death

Russian forensic experts studying the remains of Yasser Arafat on Thursday said the Palestinian leader died a natural death, ruling out radiation poisoning. "We have completed all the studies," Vladimir Uiba, head of Russia's Federal Medical-Biological Agency (FMBA), told a news conference. "The person died a natural death and not from radiation.". Arafat's remains were exhumed last year and some 60 samples were taken and divided between Swiss and Russian investigators as well as a French team carrying out a probe at the request of Arafat's widow, Suha.

Arafat did not die of poisoning, French tests conclude

By Paul Taylor PARIS (Reuters) - Yasser Arafat was not the victim of poisoning, French forensic scientists concluded on Tuesday, countering a Swiss report on the 2004 death of the Palestinian leader that found he was probably killed with radioactive polonium. The French conclusions were immediately challenged by his widow, Suha Arafat, who has argued the death was a political assassination by someone close to her husband. A senior Palestinian official dismissed the report as "politicized".

Analysis of Arafat's remains support poisoning hypothesis

Lausanne, Switzerland, Nov 7 (EFE).- The results of the analysis of the remains of late Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat are consistent with the idea that he was poisoned with radioactive polonium, the director of Switzerland's Institute of Radiation Physics said here Thursday. François Bochud explained the conclusions at a press conference held along with Patrice Mangin, head of Lausanne University Hospital's forensics center.

Polonium levels indicate third party role in Arafat death

The high levels of polonium found in the remains and personal effects of Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat indicate third party involvement in his 2004 death, Swiss scientists said Thursday. Professor Francois Bochud of the Lausanne Institute of Applied Radiophysics said his team measured levels of polonium up to 20 times higher than it was used to detecting in its research. "By definition, that indicates third party involvement," Bochud told reporters. "Our results offer moderate backing for the theory of poisoning."

Israel says did not poison Arafat

JERUSALEM (Reuters) - Israel said on Thursday it did not poison Yasser Arafat, making the denial after the Palestinian leader's widow said Swiss forensic tests had proven he died from radioactive polonium poisoning in 2004. "We never made a decision to harm him physically," Energy Minister Silvan Shalom, who in 2004 served as foreign minister and as a member of Israel's security cabinet, told Israel Radio.
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