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European IT firms seize opportunity from spy scandal

European IT security firms have flocked to the world's biggest high-tech fair with hopes of benefiting from the fallout from shock revelations of mass US and British spying. Exactly a year ago, Chancellor Angela Merkel vaunted her new, ultra-secure Smartphone at the opening of the same fair, the CeBIT, in the northern city of Hanover. Revelations that US intelligence allegedly eavesdropped on her mobile phone conversations and hoovered up vast amounts of online data and telephone records from average citizens have since sent shockwaves around the world.

European IT firms seize opportunity from spy scandal

European IT security firms have flocked to the world's biggest high-tech fair with hopes of benefiting from the fallout from shock revelations of mass US and British spying. Exactly a year ago, Chancellor Angela Merkel vaunted her new, ultra-secure Smartphone at the opening of the same fair, the CeBIT, in the northern city of Hanover. Revelations that US intelligence allegedly eavesdropped on her mobile phone conversations and hoovered up vast amounts of online data and telephone records from average citizens have since sent shockwaves around the world.

Under shadow of spy scandal, Merkel, Cameron head to tech fair

The German and British leaders will officially open the world's biggest high-tech fair on Sunday, amid global debate about data security following revelations of mass US and British online snooping. Chancellor Angela Merkel joins fellow conservative Prime Minister David Cameron to inaugurate the CeBIT in the northern German city of Hanover, 10 days after her high-profile London visit.

Germany eyes new Internet industrial revolution

Known throughout the world for quality cars and industrial giants, Germany is now seeking to position itself for the coming revolution, "industry 4.0", powered by Internet. "The Internet has become an integral part of industry," said Chancellor Angela Merkel as she inaugurated the CeBIT, the world's biggest high-tech fair here in the northern city of Hanover. And German firms at the CeBIT show were scrambling not to get left behind by the global competition when it comes to making industrial processes smarter and more interconnected.

'Brainpainting' draws crowds at world's top tech fair

A computer programme enabling paralysed patients to create artwork using just the power of their brains drew big crowds on Wednesday at the CeBIT, the world's top IT fair. Under a system pioneered by Austrian firm g-tec, the user wears a cap that measures brain activity. By focusing hard on a flashing icon on a screen, the cap can recognise the specific brain activity connected to that item, allowing the user to "choose" what he or she wants the computer to do.

World's top tech fair pins hopes on Asia, social media

The world's biggest high-tech fair, the CeBIT, kicks off Tuesday, pinning its hopes on growing tech regions Asia and Africa and the hot topic of social media to beat competition from other high-profile fairs. More than 4,000 exhibitors from some 70 countries are expected to set up shop in the northern German city of Hanover, about the same number as last year despite the weak economic environment, organisers said.

China overtakes Japan on IT spending: German trade body

China has overtaken Japan in terms of its share of global IT spending, German IT industry organisation BITKOM said Wednesday, ahead of the CeBIT, the world's biggest high-tech trade fair. Global IT spending is poised to rise by 5.1 percent to 2.7 trillion euros ($3.5 trillion), said BITKOM in a new survey, with India (+13.9 percent), Brazil (+9.6 percent) and China (+8.9 percent) the biggest growth markets.
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