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Slovenia can manage bank strains without outside help

Slovenia, where troubled banks need about 4.8 billion euros ($6.6 billion) in fresh capital, can solve the problem on its own and does not need an international bailout, the EU said on Thursday. Having taken remedial action, it is now "clear that Slovenia can proceed with the repair of its financial sector without turning to her European partners for financial assistance," EU Economic Affairs Commissioner Olli Rehn said. There had been concerns that Slovenia might follow Spain in seeking help for badly over-extended banks which threatened to bring the whole economy down.

Slovenia can manage bank strains without outside help

Slovenia, where troubled banks need about 4.8 billion euros ($6.6 billion) in fresh capital, can solve the problem on its own and does not need an international bailout, the EU said on Thursday. Having taken remedial action, it is now "clear that Slovenia can proceed with the repair of its financial sector without turning to her European partners for financial assistance," EU Economic Affairs Commissioner Olli Rehn said. There had been concerns that Slovenia might follow Spain in seeking help for badly over-extended banks which threatened to bring the whole economy down.

Slovenia finance ministry sees privatisation plan in May

LJUBLJANA (Reuters) - Slovenia's finance ministry said on Thursday it expects to submit a privatisation plan to the government in the second week of May to help the country to avoid needing an international bailout. The news contradicted a statement by Prime Minister Alenka Bratusek that a privatisation plan would be revealed as early as this week, which could add to investor frustration over the slow pace of developments and lack of details.

New PM for troubled euro member Slovenia

Political newcomer Alenka Bratusek faced Thursday the tough task of trying to form a government in crisis-hit Slovenia, a day after Prime Minister Janez Jansa was turfed out of office. Slovenia's first female premier has said her top priorities are "normalising" life by softening "excessive" austerity measures that, as in other eurozone nations, have been unpopular with ordinary voters. First though she has two weeks to present a cabinet to parliament or the president will call early elections -- the second in two-million-strong Slovenia in 14 months.
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