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Oregon investigates mysterious honeybee deaths along state highway

By Shelby Sebens PORTLAND, Oregon (Reuters) - Oregon agriculture authorities are investigating the mysterious deaths of potentially thousands of honeybees along a highway, the second die-off of bees in the state in less than a year. Officials said on Wednesday that they did not reach the site along highway 99 in Sherwood, a small city southwest of Portland, in time to document the precise number of bees.

Chinese man covered with 460,000 bees for honey stunt

A Chinese beekeeper covered his semi-naked body in more than 460,000 bees for a publicity stunt aimed at selling more of his honey, he told AFP Thursday, using a technique known as "bee bearding". She Ping, a 34-year-old honey merchant from the southwestern Chinese metropolis of Chongqing, covered himself in bees that collectively weighed more than 45 kilograms (100 pounds) in a display for a group of French photographers on Wednesday, he said.

Chinese man covered with 460,000 bees for honey stunt

A Chinese beekeeper covered his semi-naked body in more than 460,000 bees for a publicity stunt aimed at selling more of his honey, he told AFP Thursday, using a technique known as "bee bearding." She Ping, a 34-year-old honey merchant from the southwestern Chinese metropolis of Chongqing, covered himself in bees that collectively weighed more than 45 kilograms (100 pounds) in a display for a group of French photographers on Wednesday, he said.

Romania keeps ancient tradition of bee medicine alive

Bee venom to combat multiple sclerosis, pollen for indigestion, honey to heal wounds -- the humble bee has been a key source of alternative medicines since ancient times, and Romania is working to keep the tradition of "apitherapy" alive. The tradition goes back to ancient Greece when Hippocrates applied honey to treat wounds, and the Romans saw pollen as "life-giving". In the past of India, China and Egypt, a resinous substance collected by bees from the buds of certain trees, known as "propolis", was popular as an antiseptic.

Birds of a feather: hummingbird family tree unveiled

By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - For such small creatures, hummingbirds certainly have racked up an outsized list of unique claims to fame. They are the smallest birds and the smallest warm-blooded animals on Earth. They have the fastest heart and the fastest metabolism of any vertebrate. They are the only birds that can fly backward. And scientists reported on Thursday that they also have a complicated evolutionary history.

Birds of a feather: hummingbird family tree unveiled

By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - For such small creatures, hummingbirds certainly have racked up an outsized list of unique claims to fame. They are the smallest birds and the smallest warm-blooded animals on Earth. They have the fastest heart and the fastest metabolism of any vertebrate. They are the only birds that can fly backward. And scientists reported on Thursday that they also have a complicated evolutionary history.

A quarter of Europe's bumblebees, vital to crops, face extinction: study

By Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent OSLO (Reuters) - Almost a quarter of Europe's bumblebees are at risk of extinction due to loss of habitats and climate change, threatening pollination of crops worth billions of dollars, a study showed on Wednesday. Sixteen of 68 bumblebee species in Europe are at risk, the Red List of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) said. It is preparing a global study of the bees, whose honeybee cousins are in steep decline because of disease.

Sensors to be attached to bees to study their decline in Australia

Sydney, Jan 15 (EFE).- Australian scientists will attach tiny sensors on some 5,000 honey bees to study their behavior and gain an understanding of the causes of the ongoing decline in their population, ABC Online reported Wednesday. The project undertaken by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization and the University of Tasmania is designed to help improve honey production and requires that part of the bees' bodies be shaved so that the sensors can be glued on, a procedure which doesn't harm the bee or impede its mobility.

Sensors to be attached to bees to study their decline in Australia

Sydney, Jan 15 (EFE).- Australian scientists will attach tiny sensors on some 5,000 honey bees to study their behavior and gain an understanding of the causes of the ongoing decline in their population, ABC Online reported Wednesday. The project undertaken by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization and the University of Tasmania is designed to help improve honey production and requires that part of the bees' bodies be shaved so that the sensors can be glued on, a procedure which doesn't harm the bee or impede its mobility.

Australian scientists microchip bees to map movements, halt diseases

By Thuy Ong SYDNEY (Reuters) - Australian scientists are gluing tiny sensors onto thousands of honey bees to track their movements in a trial aimed at halting the spread of diseases that have wiped out populations in the northern hemisphere.
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