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New York police disband unit that spied on Muslims

New York police said Tuesday that they had disbanded a deeply controversial and heavily criticized unit that sent undercover officers to spy on local Muslims. Civil liberty groups welcomed the move, but called on New York authorities to address the damage exerted by unjustified spying based solely on religion. The decision by America's largest police force is the first sign that new commissioner William Bratton is moving away from some of the post-9/11 intelligence-gathering practices of his predecessor, The New York Times reported.

NSA denies exploiting 'Heartbleed' vulnerability

The US National Security Agency on Friday denied a report claiming it was aware of and even exploited the "Heartbleed" online security flaw to gather critical intelligence. The stern denial came amid growing panic among Internet users the world over about the newly exposed flaw, after a report by Bloomberg News said the spy agency decided to keep quiet about the matter and even used it to scoop up more data, including passwords.

NSA denies exploiting 'Heartbleed' vulnerability

The US National Security Agency on Friday denied a report claiming it was aware of and even exploited the "Heartbleed" online security flaw to gather intelligence. The stern denial came amid growing panic among Internet users about the newly exposed flaw, after a report by Bloomberg News said the spy agency decided to keep quiet about the matter to more easily gather intelligence.

Court wont' take early challenge to NSA phone surveillance, cases must go through lower courts

WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court on Monday declined an early look at a constitutional challenge to the National Security Agency's bulk collection of millions of Americans' telephone records, instead allowing the dispute to work its way through the usual lower-court process. The decision means the high court will not take the unusual step of short-circuiting appeals courts as they consider contrary opinions over the legitimacy of the agency's vast surveillance program.

Supreme Court declines early look at case challenging government phone surveillance

WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court has declined an early look at a constitutional challenge to the National Security Agency's bulk collection of millions of Americans' telephone records. Conservative lawyer Larry Klayman persuaded a federal judge in December to rule that the agency's activities likely violate the Constitution's ban on unreasonable searches. The justices on Monday rejected Klayman's unusual request to bypass the traditional appeals process and hear the case immediately.

Obama's NSA overhaul may require phone carriers to store more data

By Mark Hosenball and Alina Selyukh WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Barack Obama's plan for overhauling the National Security Agency's phone surveillance program could force carriers to collect and store customer data that they are not now legally obliged to keep, according to U.S. officials. One complication arises from the popularity of flat-rate or unlimited calling plans, which are used by the vast majority of Americans.

US 'restrained' in cyber operations - Pentagon chief

The United States will show "restraint" in cyber operations outside of US government networks, Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel said Friday, urging other countries to do the same. Hagel, speaking at the National Security Agency (NSA) headquarters at Fort Meade, Maryland, said that the Pentagon "does not seek to 'militarize' cyberspace." Instead, Hagel said that the US government "is promoting the very qualities of the Internet -- integrity, reliability, and openness -- that have made it a catalyst for freedom and prosperity in the United States, and around the world."

Obama says plan will end NSA bulk data sweep

President Barack Obama put forward a plan Thursday to end bulk collection of telephone records, aiming to defuse a controversy over the government's sweeping surveillance activities on millions of Americans. In measures taken in response to a global outcry over the National Security Agency's eavesdropping programs, Obama said telephone companies would be required to hold data for the same length of time they currently do, while allowing government agencies to access it with court approval.

White House proposes to end NSA bulk data collection

The White House outlined plans Tuesday to end the National Security Agency's bulk telephone data collection on Americans, aiming to reassure a public outraged by revelations about widespread surveillance. The plan would keep the data outside of government while allowing access for national security reasons, officials said. Key US lawmakers welcomed the proposal, and one group put forward reform legislation along the same lines, with bipartisan support.

White House proposes to end NSA bulk data collection

The White House has proposed to halt the National Security Agency's controversial bulk telephone data collection of Americans, a program which sparked a vast public outcry. The plan would store the data outside of government while allowing access for national security reasons, officials said. President Barack Obama -- in The Hague for a nuclear security summit -- called the plan "workable" and said it "addresses the two core concerns that people have" about the NSA's surveillance.
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