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Dutch state to pay historic Srebrenica compensation

The Dutch government said Thursday it would pay 20,000 euros to relatives of three Bosnian Muslim men murdered after peacekeepers expelled them from a UN compound at Srebrenica in 1995. The announcement follows a Dutch court's landmark ruling last year that the state was liable for the deaths, the first time a government has been held responsible for the actions of peacekeepers operating under a United Nations mandate.

Srebrenica relatives drag Dutch state to court

Relatives of those killed in the 1995 Srebrenica massacre opened a civil suit against the Dutch government on Monday, saying its peacekeepers should have helped prevent Europe's worst bloodshed since World War II. "I wish the Netherlands would finally take responsibility for these events," said Munira Subasic, whose Mothers of Srebrenica victims' group brought the case before a court in The Hague. "The Dutchbat was supposed to protect us... as a mother I cannot forgive this," she said before bursting into tears, referring to the Dutch battalion of peacekeepers.

Srebrenica survivors drag Dutch state to court

Survivors of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre opened a civil suit against the Dutch government on Monday, saying Dutch peacekeepers should have protected the victims of Europe's worst massacre since World War II. "They did not prevent the murder of thousands of civilians," the group's lawyer Marco Gerritsen told the Hague court, where the case is finally being heard. The suit was first brought in 2007 by victims' group the Mothers of Srebrenica, in connection with the massacre during Bosnia's bloody three-year war in the early 1990s.

Srebrenica survivors drag Dutch state to court

Survivors of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre opened a civil suit against the Dutch government on Monday, saying Dutch peacekeepers should have protected the victims of Europe's worst massacre since World War II. "They did not prevent the murder of thousands of civilians," the group's lawyer Marco Gerritsen told the Hague court, where the case is finally being heard. The suit was first brought in 2007 by victims' group the Mothers of Srebrenica, in connection with the massacre during Bosnia's bloody three-year war in the early 1990s.

Anti-aircraft gun seized at Srebrenica ex-convict's home

Police on Wednesday seized an anti-aircraft gun and a large cache of other arms at the home of a Bosnian Serb who served eight years in jail for his role in the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, prosecutors said. Milenko Trifunovic, a former Bosnian Serb special police commander, and his aide were arrested during the search in Skelani, in eastern Bosnia, a prosecutor's statement said. The raid uncovered a 20-mm calibre M55 anti-aircraft gun of Yugoslav origin with 50 shells, an M53 machine gun, two automatic rifles, a shotgun and a pistol, a police official told AFP.

Bosnia releases 10 war crime convicts under EU court ruling

A Bosnian court on Tuesday announced the release of 10 men jailed for war crimes -- including six jailed for the Srebrenica massacre -- because of an EU legal ruling overturning the basis of their original convictions. The Sarajevo-based war crimes court was obliged to follow a judgement by the European Court on Human Rights in July that found Bosnia's 2003 criminal code had wrongly been applied retroactively in a similar case for crimes committed in the 1992-1995 Bosnian war.

Dutch state liable for Muslim deaths at Srebrenica

The Dutch state is liable for the deaths of three Bosnian Muslim men who were expelled from a UN compound at Srebrenica in 1995 and subsequently murdered, the supreme court ruled Friday. "The (appeals) court decision is upheld," Judge Floris Bakels said, ruling that it would be "unacceptable" for countries not to be able to judge their peacekeeping troops. Relatives of the victims broke down in tears and hugged each other and their lawyers after the verdict was read out.

Dutch state blamed in three Srebrenica deaths: Supreme Court

By Anthony Deutsch AMSTERDAM (Reuters) - The Dutch state is responsible for the deaths of three Bosnian Muslim men ordered to leave a U.N. compound in the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, the Dutch Supreme Court said on Friday, in a ruling that may impact future peacekeeping missions. Hasan Nuhanovic, who worked as a U.N. translator during the Balkan wars, filed the case against the Dutch state more than a decade ago, seeking justice for the murders of his mother, father and brother.

Dutch state held responsible for Srebrenica massacre deaths

The three men at the centre of the case were among almost 8,000 Muslim men and boys slaughtered by troops commanded by Bosnian Serb general Ratko Mladic in the worst atrocity of Bosnia's brutal civil war.

Dutch state sent Bosniaks to death at Srebrenica

The Dutch state is responsible for sending three Bosnian Muslims to their deaths when they were expelled from a UN compound at Srebrenica in 1995, the supreme court ruled Friday. "The (appeals) court decision is upheld," Judge Floris Bakels said as relatives of the victims broke down in tears and hugged each other. ndy/cjo/jhe/yad
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