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US urges Myanmar to ease tensions

The US ambassador to the UN urged Myanmar on Thursday to intervene to stop communal violence there and protect humanitarian workers in the volatile western state of Rakhine. Myanmar, formerly called Burma, has been shaken by religious unrest in recent years with at least 250 people killed in Buddhist-Muslim clashes since 2012. Violence forced humanitarian workers to flee Rakhine earlier this month, leaving thousands facing looming food and water shortages.

U.S. envoy Power urges Myanmar action to stop Rakhine violence

UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power on Thursday urged the Myanmar government to intervene in Rakhine State to stop violence between ethnic Rakhine Buddhists and Rohingya Muslims and ensure the delivery of humanitarian aid. Power's remarks came after U.N. special adviser on Myanmar Vijay Nambiar briefed the 15-member U.N. Security Council on Thursday on the crisis in the country formerly known as Burma.

U.S. asst. secy of state calls for Myanmar to improve human rights

U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs Daniel Russel met with Myanmar President Thein Sein in Naypyitaw on Thursday and expressed concern over humanitarian situation in the country's conflict-ridden Rakhine State.

UN envoy urges Myanmar to allow aid access to Rohingyas

YANGON (Reuters) - A U.N. envoy on Monday urged Myanmar to allow the return of aid groups forced to flee attacks in Rakhine state, warning their departure threatened "severe consequences" for Muslims sheltering in camps from violence by majority Buddhists. Tomas Ojea Quintana, the U.N.'s Special Rapporteur on the human rights situation in Myanmar, said water shortages could reach critical levels within a week in some displacement camps, where 140,000 people live as a result of communal conflict since 2012.

UN warns of health crisis brewing in west Myanmar

More than 800,000 people lack adequate healthcare in strife-torn western Myanmar after aid workers fled the region, the UN has warned, with children deprived of life-saving treatment. A wave of attacks against humanitarian workers in Rakhine state has choked off health, water and food supplies to isolated communities and camps for people displaced by deadly sectarian violence.

Humanitarian crisis looms in western Myanmar as foreign aid workers leave

DHAECHAUNG VILLAGE, Myanmar (Reuters) - With food stocks dwindling and prices rising by the hour in his camp for displaced Rohingya in Myanmar's Rakhine state, Hla Maung decided to ask a friend in the neighboring village for food.

Humanitarian crisis looms in western Myanmar as foreign aid workers leave

DHAECHAUNG VILLAGE, Myanmar (Reuters) - With food stocks dwindling and prices rising by the hour in his camp for displaced Rohingya in Myanmar's Rakhine state, Hla Maung decided to ask a friend in the neighbouring village for food.

Food shortages loom as aid workers flee west Myanmar

Thousands of vulnerable people in strife-torn western Myanmar are close to running out of food and clean water, according to aid groups forced to flee the region after a wave of mob violence. Many displaced people -- mostly stateless Rohingya Muslims -- living in bleak camps in Rakhine State are completely reliant on humanitarian deliveries, which have now stopped as a result of the unprecedented attacks on relief organisations.

Tensions as Myanmar embarks on first census in 30 years

Tens of thousands of census-takers fanned out across Myanmar on Sunday to gather data for a rare snapshot of the former junta-ruled nation that is already stoking sectarian tensions. Groups of school teachers and local officials began the 12-day population survey -- the first since 1983 -- travelling from house to house in an ambitious drive aimed at counting everyone across the poverty-stricken nation. But the census was called into question even before it started in Rakhine state, the site of deadly religious conflict.

Tensions as Myanmar embarks on first census in 30 years

Tens of thousands of census-takers fanned out across Myanmar on Sunday to gather data for a rare snapshot of the former junta-ruled nation that is already stoking sectarian tensions. Groups of schoolteachers and local officials began the 12-day population survey -- the first since 1983 -- travelling from house to house in an ambitious drive aimed at counting everyone across the poverty-stricken nation.
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