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China's Yao Ming says faced shark fin resistance

Chinese basketball superstar Yao Ming said Friday that he was shocked by protests when he spoke out against eating shark fin, but credits his campaign with helping the species rebound. On a return visit to the United States, the retired Houston Rocket said he had "all good memories" from his NBA days, even when he endured taunts by Shaquille O'Neal.

Calif wildlife officials bust San Francisco man with more than a ton of shark fin

SAN FRANCISCO - More than a ton of illegal shark fins were seized from a vendor in San Francisco, state wildlife officials said Friday. Michael Kwong, 42, of Kwong Yip Inc. was cited for having 2,138 pounds of the fins, which violates California's ban that went into effect in July, said Lt. Patrick Foy of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. Possessing shark fins, selling or trading them is a misdemeanour under California's law, so Foy said it will be up to a judge to determine any penalty.

Environmentalists hail China shark fin ban at official banquets

Environmentalists hailed Monday a Chinese government ban on serving shark's fin and bird's nest soup among other wild animal products at official functions, saying it will set a precedent that will help protect endangered species. China's ruling Communist Party announced the ban as part of a sweeping government crackdown on corruption, excessive spending and extravagance.

Environmentalists hail China's banquet ban on shark fin

Environmentalists hailed Monday a Chinese government ban on serving shark's fin, bird's nest soup and other wild animal products at official functions, saying it will set a precedent that will help protect endangered species. China's ruling Communist Party announced the ban as part of a sweeping government crackdown on corruption, excessive spending and extravagance.

China bans shark fin soup from official receptions

China announced a ban on the serving of shark fin and bird's nest soup at official banquets Sunday, as part of a sweeping government crackdown on corruption and excessive spending. Shark fin has effectively been off the menu at official dining tables since 2012 when Beijing pledged to bar the popular yet controversial delicacy as part of its anti-extravagance campaign.

New Zealand to ban shark finning

New Zealand is to ban shark finning in its waters within two years, Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy announced Sunday. It is already illegal in New Zealand to slice the fin off a shark and throw it back alive, and Guy said the new ban would be extended to finning a shark and dumping the carcass at sea. It will start to take effect in some areas next October and cover all New Zealand waters by 2016. "The practise of finning sharks is inconsistent with New Zealand's reputation as one of the best managed and conserved fisheries in the world," he said.

Fiji's Air Pacific bans 'unsustainable' shark fins

Fiji's national carrier Air Pacific announced Monday it will no longer carry shark fins that come from unsustainable or unverified sources. The airline said it had carried out a month-long review of its freight policies and decided to only accept shark products from sustainable sources which did not involve threatened species. "This is consistent with our overriding commitment to environmental protection and conservation efforts in Fiji," acting chief executive Aubrey Swift said in a statement.

Korean Air stops carrying shark fins

SEOUL, June 20 (Yonhap) -- Korean Air Lines Co., South Korea's top air carrier, said Thursday that it has stopped carrying shark fin cargo, the latest airline to join global efforts to save endangered shark species. The decision, which took effect on June 10, came three months after government delegates at the triennial World's Wildlife Conference in Thailand voted to protect five shark species by controlling their trade and harvest, though they did not impose a full ban.

Sharks worth more for tourism than in soup: study

By Environment Correspondent Alister Doyle OSLO (Reuters) - Sharks swimming free in the oceans may soon become more valuable as tourist attractions than when caught, sliced up and served in soup, a global study showed on Friday. It urged better protection for the fish, from Australia to the Caribbean, to reduce catches of an estimated 38 million a year to meet demand for shark fin soup, mainly in China.

Environmentalists protest shark fishing in Nicaragua

Managua, Apr 17 (EFE).- An environmental group is calling for a greater government presence in Nicaragua's Caribbean waters following the discovery of a boat with dozens of dead sharks aboard in Little Corn Island. Complaints have been filed with the Environment and Natural Resources Ministry, or Marena, and the Nicaraguan Aquaculture and Fishing Institute about the shark slaughter, the Nicaraguan Foundation for Sustainable Development, or Fundenic-SOS, said.
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