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World Bank's Kim: End 'silly' debate on climate change

World Bank President Jim Yong Kim said Tuesday that the deadly typhoon disaster in the Philippines should put an end to "silly" arguments denying climate change. "If you think of the number of storms that have hit over the past year, the severity of those storms... The frequency of these events is increasing and that's exactly what the climate change scientists have predicted," Kim said. "What I hope the tragedy in the Philippines helps us to do is to move away from having what I think are silly arguments about not really the science, but about science as a whole."

Pope talks joint action with World Bank

Pope Francis and World Bank president Jim Yong Kim on Wednesday discussed the possibility of working together in the struggle against global extreme poverty during a meeting at the Vatican. "What the Holy Father has been saying about inclusion and poverty is exactly the same thing as what we've been saying," Kim, a trained doctor, told reporters after his audience with the pontiff. "We discussed how we could work more closely together... We feel that if we can find ways of working together we could build a social movement that could accelerate progress," he said.

World Bank to cut costs, bureaucracy

World Bank President Jim Yong Kim on Friday announced a program to slash costs and reduce bureaucracy at the huge development organization that is expected to result in significant layoffs. Kim said the Bank would seek to reduce annual costs by $400 million a year, restructuring to reduce compartmentalization and cut bureaucracy, to better deliver bank services in its fight against poverty and underdevelopment.

Exclusive: No country immune from turmoil over inequality: World Bank's Kim

No country in the world is immune from unrest arising from poverty and inequality, World Bank President Jim Yong Kim told AFP in an exclusive interview. The protests in Brazil, Turkey, and elsewhere show that even governments who have made significant efforts already cannot let up in programs to help the poor, he said. "There's no country in the world that is immune from having this kind of citizen's movement rise up to demand even more," he said. "It shows that the power of civil society and the power of citizens to rise up is unlike anything we've seen in history.

Exclusive: No country immune from turmoil over inequality: World Bank's Kim

No country in the world is immune from unrest arising from poverty and inequality, World Bank President Jim Yong Kim told AFP in an exclusive interview. The protests in Brazil, Turkey, and elsewhere show that even governments who have made significant efforts already cannot let up in programs to help the poor, he said. "There's no country in the world that is immune from having this kind of citizen's movement rise up to demand even more," he said. "It shows that the power of civil society and the power of citizens to rise up is unlike anything we've seen in history.

World Bank aims to get private sector to help end extreme poverty for millions

MONTREAL - The World Bank is aiming to end extreme global poverty by 2030 by leveraging contributions of the private sector, the agency's president said Tuesday. "In order to get there, we're going to be extremely realistic about the sources of growth and job creation that will lead to our ability as a world to end poverty," Jim Yong Kim told reporters at an economic conference. Currently, the $125 billion a year in official development assistance "pales in comparison to the need," Kim said.

World Bank sets 'expiration date' on poverty

The World Bank gathered the might of the international community Saturday behind its audacious plan to eradicate extreme poverty within a generation. "This is it. This is the global target to end poverty," said World Bank President Jim Yong Kim, visibly pleased after the International Monetary Fund and the Bank endorsed the poverty offensive. "For the first time in history, we have committed to setting a target to end poverty. We are no longer dreaming of a world free of poverty," Kim said at a news conference.

World Bank sets 'expiration date' on poverty

The World Bank gathered the might of the international community Saturday behind its audacious plan to eradicate extreme poverty within a generation. "This is it. This is the global target to end poverty," said World Bank President Jim Yong Kim, visibly pleased after the International Monetary Fund and the Bank endorsed the poverty offensive. "For the first time in history, we have committed to setting a target to end poverty. We are no longer dreaming of a world free of poverty," Kim said at a news conference.

World Bank seeks commitments to poverty battle

The World Bank will press the international community to endorse its 2030 anti-poverty goals at next week's meeting with the IMF, Bank president Jim Yong Kim said Friday. "Our top priority for this meeting is simple and clear: We want to push the world to commit to ending extreme poverty by 2030 and boosting shared prosperity in countries worldwide," Kim said in a conference call with reporters.

World Bank seeks end to extreme poverty by 2030

World Bank chief Jim Yong Kim on Tuesday called for a global drive to wipe out extreme poverty by 2030, acknowledging that reaching the goal will require extraordinary efforts. "A world free of poverty is within our grasp. It is time to help everyone across the globe secure a one-way ticket out of poverty and stay on the path toward prosperity," Kim said in a speech in Washington.
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