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U.S. commodity ETFs fall for fifth quarter: Lipper

By Barani Krishnan NEW YORK (Reuters) - U.S. retail and institutional investors pulled cash from broad commodity exchange-traded funds for a fifth straight quarter even as coffee, natural gas and hogs prices had their best run in years, data from Thomson Reuters Lipper showed on Wednesday. Lipper, which tracks nearly 270 U.S. exchange-traded commodity funds and products worth about $240 billion, noted a net outflow of nearly $2.7 billion in the first quarter of this year.

Smart shopping for mid-caps

(The opinions expressed here are those of the author, a columnist for Reuters.) By John Wasik CHICAGO (Reuters) - Go for the most famous companies when you are investing, and you are likely to pay the highest price possible because most investors place a premium on the biggest-name stocks. But take a look at the roughly 1,500 companies that make up the mid-cap market, and you could be making a pretty solid investment this year.

Leveraged ETFs not just for day traders anymore

By Ashley Lau NEW YORK (Reuters) - Leveraged exchange-traded funds, originally viewed as tools for fast-moving day traders, are showing up more frequently as buy-and-hold investments in Mom and Pop portfolios, thanks to the advisers who are putting them there.

Exchange Traded Fund providers worry about 'clutter' in sector

By Ashley Lau HOLLYWOOD, Florida (Reuters) - At a time when the number of exchange-traded funds has skyrocketed to more than 1,500, major fund providers say they see a need to rein in product proliferation and focus on developing ETFs that are more targeted to specific investor needs.

Exchange Traded Fund providers worry about 'clutter' in sector

By Ashley Lau HOLLYWOOD, Florida (Reuters) - At a time when the number of exchange-traded funds has skyrocketed to more than 1,500, major fund providers say they see a need to rein in product proliferation and focus on developing ETFs that are more targeted to specific investor needs.

Analysis: Emerging market investors find some places to hide

By David Randall and Ashley Lau NEW YORK (Reuters) - After a scary sell-off in emerging markets in the past week, investors who specialize in the sector are looking for places to hide while also looking for opportunities to benefit. And that means finding countries that have stronger economic underpinnings and political stability, while abandoning or betting against those whose current account balances and government budgets are deeply in the red and where there is political turmoil.

Will last year's stock market laggards be 2014's winners?

By John Wasik CHICAGO (Reuters) - If the stock market rally continues, last year's laggards may be this year's winners. Many of the sectors that could do well are late bloomers in the five-year bull run. They may not seem like obvious choices, yet are worthwhile if you're contrarian or slightly defensive. Assuming economic fundamentals and corporate earnings remain solid, it could be a decent year for stocks overall and even better for companies that were neglected in 2013.

ETF turnover jumps 46 pct in 2013

SEOUL, Jan. 12 (Yonhap) -- The daily turnover in South Korea's exchange-traded funds (ETFs) market jumped 46 percent last year as investors moved to safer and profitable destinations amid low interest rates, data showed Sunday. The average daily trading volume of ETFs came to 793 billion won (US$747 million) last year, compared with 544 billion won a year earlier, according to the data compiled by bourse operator Korea Exchange (KRX).

Hot 2014 investing tip: Don't chase 2013

By John Wasik CHICAGO (Reuters) - This year, the stock market has been glowing as brightly as the seasonal lights that now bedeck holiday streetscapes. But if you want your investments to keep doing well in 2014, look away from the shiny stuff. If the winners of 2013 follow historical patterns, they won't sustain their market-beating performances next year. Consider the most stellar performer of 2012.

Burn Notice: Watch out for leveraged ETFs

(The opinions expressed here are those of the author, a columnist for Reuters.) By John Wasik CHICAGO (Reuters) - If you buy insurance on your home, you know that most of your losses would be covered in a catastrophe. Can you do the same with your portfolio? There are lots of ways to buy portfolio insurance, but you have to be careful with leveraged exchange-traded funds (ETFs), which may offer protection, but carry a huge downside risk.
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